Tag: Googles

11
Oct
2020
Posted in gadget

Google’s new streaming TV gadget is a great alternative to Roku or Amazon Fire TV

  • The Chromecast with Google TV is a real rival to the Roku and Amazon Fire TV now.
  • It finally runs software, called Google TV, that lets you browse shows, movies and apps.
  • It costs $50, and CNBC has been testing it for over a week. Here’s what it’s like.



graphical user interface, website: Chromecast with Google TV


© Provided by CNBC
Chromecast with Google TV

The new $50 Chromecast with Google TV is Google’s first real rival to Roku and Amazon Fire TV. 

It brings a lot of features that never existed on a Chromecast before, such as a full remote and brand-new Google TV software that makes it easier to find movies and TV shows. And it ties into all sorts of services, such as Hulu, HBO Max, Netflix and Disney+.

Previously, the Chromecast let you play content on your computer, but you had to select content on your phone. Now it has a whole new software experience, which makes it feel a lot more like a Roku, an Amazon Fire TV or an Apple TV. It means Google might finally be able to take some market share away from leaders Amazon and Roku.

Here’s what you need to know about it.

What’s good about the Chromecast with Google TV



a video game remote control: Chromecast with Google TV


© Provided by CNBC
Chromecast with Google TV

The new Chromecast is super simple to use. You just plug it in to your TV’s HDMI port — every modern TV has one — and turn it on.

The Google TV software has seven menu options at the top of the screen that are really straightforward: Search, For You, Live, Movies, Shows, Apps and Library. I like that the “For You” page pulls in movies and TV shows from subscriptions you pay for, such as Hulu or Netflix, and that you don’t have to open those apps to

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Here’s a first look at Google’s plans for its massive San Jose campus

  • Google released renderings for its massive downtown San Jose campus, which will face final approval in spring 2021.
  • The company’s mixed-use campus, which is in coordination with the city of San Jose, is a departure from prior campuses as more than half of it will be open to the public in some form.
  • The campus includes childcare centers, performative arts centers and ecological viewing stations.



a group of people standing in front of a building: Google releases San Jose campus rendering


© Provided by CNBC
Google releases San Jose campus rendering

Google has released a first look at its next massive campus — and it looks nothing like those before it.

The company released renderings and sketches of guidelines for its mixed-use, 80-acre campus in downtown San Jose, which will house 25,000 employees. More than half of the “Downtown West” 80-acre project — which is being built in coordination with the city of San Jose — will be allocated for residential and public space and include features like childcare centers, outdoor moving screenings and ecological viewing stations. 

“Thousands of conversations helped us hone in to what we really want in a site, which was much less the corporate campus and the financial district and much more a resilient neighborhood,” said Alexa Arena, Google’s district lead for San Jose in a video. “Downtown West is designed to be a true part of the city — the opposite of a traditional corporate campus,” lead urban designer Laura Crescimano said in a statement.

It comes a year after the company filed its initial campus framework, which kicked off formal studies and community feedback discussions.  Last month, Google launched renderings for its new town-like tech campus in Mountain View, Calif., which aims to convert 40 acres of Mountain View land into a mixed-use campus open to local residents.

Silicon Valley tech companies like Facebook and Google have begun departing

07
Oct
2020
Posted in software

The Future of Software Is at Stake in Google’s Latest Trip to the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court will finally hear arguments in a case that could rewrite the rules of software development as we know it. On Wednesday, Google will defend its use of Java code in the development of the Android operating system. Oracle claims that code is protected intellectual property, and if the court agrees, there are a lot of developers who should be nervous.





© Photo: Brendan Smialowski (Getty Images)


It’s been a decade since Oracle first sued Google, and it’s been nearly two years since the Supreme Court agreed to review the case. In that time, the Android OS has taken over about 75 percent of the mobile market—becoming one of the most successful pieces of software in history. But like all software, Android is a product of ingenuity and building on the work of others.

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During its initial development, Google wanted Android to understand commands that were used in the Java SE platform. To make this happen, it used a bunch of code to declare methods that are available in Android and Java. This code is known as an API. It’s very common to use APIs in development, and Google wanted Java developers to feel at home on Android. While most of the code in Android was proprietary, it used 11,000 lines of code for the Java API— just 0.5% of the 3 million lines of code that make up Java SE. Plenty of other developers out there threw this code into their projects at the time, but Android was big enough to get Oracle’s attention, and in 2010 it sued for copyright infringement.

So far, a jury agreed with Google in 2016, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that ruling in 2018. At issue is the complicated application of copyright law

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Paytm, other Indian startups vow to fight ‘big daddy’ Google’s clout: sources

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Dozens of India’s technology startups, chafing at Google’s local dominance of key apps, are banding together to consider ways to challenge the U.S. tech giant, including by lodging complaints with the government and courts, executives told Reuters.

FILE PHOTO: A man walks past the sign of “Google for India”, the company’s annual technology event in New Delhi, India, September 19, 2019. REUTERS/Sankalp Phartiyal/File Photo

Although Google, owned by Alphabet Inc GOOGL.O, has worked closely with India’s booming startup sector and is ramping up its investments, it has recently angered many tech companies with what they say are unfair practices.

Setting the stage for a potential showdown, entrepreneurs held two video conferences this week to strategise, three executives told Reuters.

“It’s definitely going to be a bitter fight,” said Dinesh Agarwal, CEO of e-commerce firm IndiaMART INMR.NS. “Google will lose this battle. It’s just a matter of time.”

He said executives have discussed forming a new startup association aimed chiefly at lodging protests with the Indian government and courts against the Silicon Valley company.

Nearly 99% of the smartphones of India’s half a billion users run on Google’s Android mobile operating system. Some Indian startups say that allows Google to exert excessive control over the types of apps and other services they can offer, an allegation the company denies.

The uproar began last month when Google removed popular payments app Paytm from its Play Store, citing policy violations. This led to a sharp rebuke from the Indian firm’s founder, Vijay Shekhar Sharma, whose app returned to the Google platform a few hours later, after Paytm made certain changes.

In a video call on Tuesday, Sharma called Google the “big daddy” that controls the “oxygen supply of (app) distribution” on Android phones, according to an attendee.

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Google’s Daydream VR is Officially Dead

Illustration for article titled Googles Daydream VR Is Officially, Really, Finally Dead

Photo: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo

If you happen to be one of the few people who still use Google’s Daydream VR platform, I’m sorry to tell you that it’s officially dead. (If you didn’t know Daydream was a thing, that’s totally OK. I forgot it was, too.) Spotted by Android Authority, Google recently issued a service update for Daydream letting any lingering users know the software is no longer supported.

“You may still be able to access the service, but it won’t receive any more software or security updates,” said the support page. “The Daydream VR app is no longer supported by Google and may not work properly on some devices running Android 11 or later.”

Some recent reviews on the platform’s Google Play store page show users users having difficulty launching Chrome in Daydream, as well as one confirming that it does not work with the latest Android 11 update. The writing was on the wall long before today, though.

Last October, VentureBeat reported that Google would discontinue support for Daydream starting with the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL. It also stopped selling the VR headsets the same day, too. The Pixel 3a and Pixel 3a XL shipped without Daydream VR support in May 2019, and Google also removed its Play Movies & TV app Daydream in June 2019. Hulu dropped its support for the platform in September 2019.

“Over time we noticed some clear limitations constraining smartphone VR from being a viable long-term solution,” a Google spokesperson said to VentureBeat. “There also hasn’t been the broad consumer or developer adoption we had hoped, and we’ve seen decreasing usage over time of the Daydream View headset.”

VR that relied on your smartphone always felt sort of gimmicky and dumb from the