Tag: goals

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management – Reuters poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask uses an escalator in a quiet business district on the first working day after the Golden Week holiday, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7,2020.REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

“Regardless of sex, we should hire talented people and promote them on their merits, rather than putting priority on the proportion,” a chemicals maker manager wrote in the survey.

A paper and pulp maker manager wrote: “We hire more female new graduates than male, but many female hires tend to leave the company after a while, making it hard to raise female managers.”

The survey, conducted for Reuters by Nikkei Research, canvassed 485 large and midsize non-financial firms. About 240 firms answered the questions on condition of anonymity.

The results were similar to the previous poll taken in 2018.

Japan’s global ranking on gender parity fell to 121st out of 153 countries in a World Economic Forum report for 2020.

New premier Yoshihide Suga’s 21-member cabinet has just two female ministers, and women account for just short of 10% of all lawmakers in parliament’s powerful lower house.

While aiming to

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Amazon Ramps Up Delivery Business With Rivian Electric Vehicles To Reach Climate Goals

As Amazon (AMZN) continues the expansion of its delivery fleet, the online retailer has revealed its electric delivery van developed in partnership with Rivian.

The all-electric vans have begun to arrive just a year after Amazon made a commitment to be net-zero carbon by 2040. The company has plans to take delivery of 100,000 electric vans from Rivian by 2030, with 10,000 expected to be on the roads by 2022.

The Rivian vans were developed to “enhance the driver experience and optimize safety” with a customized configuration that comes in three different models. The vans feature sensor detection, highway and traffic assist features, larger windshield, exterior cameras with digital display, Alexa integration, stronger door design, interior “dancefloor” for added space, multiple tail lights, and three levels of shelving to store packages.

“When we set out to create our first customized electric delivery vehicle with Rivian, we knew that it needed to far surpass any other delivery vehicle,” Ross Rachey, director of Amazon’s Global Fleet and Products, said in a statement.

“We wanted drivers to love using it and customers to feel excited when they saw it driving through their neighborhood and pulling up to their home. We combined Rivian’s technology with our delivery logistics knowledge, and the result is what you see here–the future of last mile delivery,” he added.

The deal with Rivian for the electric vans followed an investment by Amazon into the electric truck maker. Rivian, which also received investments from Ford, Cox Automotive, and T.Rowe Price Associates, is set to release the R1T electric truck and R1S electric SUV in 2021.

“The vehicle we’ve developed with Amazon is not just electric,” RJ Scaringe, Rivian CEO, said in a statement. “We prioritized safety and functionality to create a vehicle that’s optimized for package delivery. We thought through