Tag: Global

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Veritone Licensing Expands Global News Library with Exclusive Agreement with the South China Morning Post

New agreement adds SCMP’s international news content dating back over 100 years to the Veritone content licensing portfolio

Veritone, Inc. (Nasdaq: VERI), the creator of the world’s first operating system for artificial intelligence, aiWARE™, and provider of digital content licensing services on behalf of the world’s premier sports entities, news organizations and user-generated networks, today announced a new agreement with South China Morning Post, a leading global news company that has reported on China and Asia for more than a century.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201014005137/en/

Veritone Licensing signs exclusive agreement with the South China Morning Post to expands its global news library. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The agreement gives Veritone the exclusive rights to license SCMP’s archive and current video content to its clients in North America. The deal is a significant milestone in Veritone’s strategy to further expand the global reach of its already vast, AI-powered content library and enable content creators to engage with new and existing audiences through highly relevant content.

“We are thrilled to announce our new agreement with the South China Morning Post, as it has a long and decorated history as a leading news company in China and Asia,” said Jay Bailey, vice president of entertainment licensing at Veritone. “At Veritone, we are proud to add this unique Asian voice from an important source on the world’s stage to our expanding news library as we continue our mission to provide creatives with greater options to tell their stories.”

The Post is Hong Kong’s paper of record and has been a unique link between China and the rest of the world since the newspaper’s founding in 1903. It has a growing correspondent staff across Asia and the United States. The agreement covers a comprehensive collection of SCMP’s content that

14
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

App Allowing Chinese Citizens Access to Global Internet Quickly Disappears | Voice of America

WASHINGTON – A mobile app launched last week in China that many there hoped would allow access to long banned Western social media sites abruptly disappeared from Chinese app stores a day after its unveiling.

Tuber, an Andriod app backed by Chinese cyber security software giant Qihoo 360, first appeared to be officially available last Friday. It offered Chinese citizens limited access to websites such as YouTube, Facebook and Google, and it facilitated some 5 million downloads following its debut.

Yet a day later, the Tuber app disappeared from mobile app stores, including one run by Huawei Technologies Co. A search for the app’s website yielded no results when VOA checked Monday. It’s unclear whether the government ordered the takedown of the app.

Experts told VOA that such ventures are sometimes designed to create the illusion of choice to users eager to gain access to the global internet, but these circumvention tools are sometimes deleted if they are deemed by the Chinese government to be too popular with consumers.

FILE PHOTO: The messenger app WeChat is seen next to its logo in this illustration picture taken Aug. 7, 2020.

Short-lived frenzy

Chinese users hailed their newfound ability to visit long banned websites before the app was removed last Saturday.

Several now banned articles introducing Tuber went viral Friday on China’s super app WeChat and seem to have contributed to Tuber’s overnight success.

Sporting a logo similar to that of YouTube, Tuber’s main page offered a feed of YouTube videos, while another tab allowed users go to Western websites banned in China.

A reporter at Chinese state media Global Times tweeted that the move is “good for China’s stability and it’s a great step for China’s opening up.”

14
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

COVID is worsening global internet freedom, report finds

Governments around the world have seized on the coronavirus crisis as an opportunity to expand digital surveillance and harvest more data on their citizens, according to a report out Wednesday from Freedom House, a democracy and human rights research group.

Why it matters: Privacy advocates have warned since early in the pandemic that the tech behind efforts to conduct contact tracing and enforce quarantines and other public safety protocols could be abused and made permanent, particularly in authoritarian countries like China.

What’s happening, according to the report:

Dozens of countries have rolled out government-backed contact-tracing apps without effective laws to protect people from overly expansive data collection.

  • China, Russia, India, Singapore, Ecuador and Bahrain were among the countries that Freedom House found implemented apps that either send reams of data unchecked to government servers or make invasive data and health documentation demands.

Governments in at least 28 countries censored websites and social media posts to suppress information like unfavorable health statistics and corruption allegations.

  • Many have also imprisoned those who speak out online against government mishandling of the pandemic, and some have at times imposed total internet blackouts on their citizens.

By the numbers: As documented in a release summing up the findings:

Authorities censored reporting on the virus in 28 countries and arrested online critics in 45 countries.

In at least 20 countries, the pandemic was cited as a justification to impose vague or overly broad restrictions on speech. Residents of at least 13 countries experienced internet shutdowns…

In at least 30 countries, governments are invoking the pandemic to engage in mass surveillance in direct partnership with telecommunications providers and other companies.

— Freedom House

Of note: China was found to have the world’s worst conditions for internet freedom for the sixth consecutive year, but the U.S. was

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Alteia Accelerates the Deployment of its Enterprise AI Solutions and Announces Global Alliances with GE Digital and Microsoft

  • Alteia, a spin-off company from drone manufacturer Delair, has entered into a worldwide alliance with GE Digital to develop and market AI solutions for Power and Utilities as part of the GE Digital analytics software portfolio.

Alteia, the leader in Visual Intelligence for Enterprise, lands two major partnerships with GE Digital and Microsoft. The Alteia platform combines the best of computer vision and artificial intelligence (AI) technologies. It provides developers, data scientists, and business analysts one common and secure database for all of their visual data, enabling them to collaborate and rapidly develop, deploy and improve over time AI based applications. These alliances will allow customers to streamline the adoption of AI designed to address issues like inventory, energy management, predictive maintenance and equipment reliability.

Alteia enables GE Digital to introduce a Visual Intelligence Platform for utilities

With the combined expertise of GE Digital and Alteia’s platform, this alliance is designed to help fast-track the delivery of enterprise-scale industry and domain-specific AI applications, shorten the time to value and accelerate the scaling of mission-critical solutions.

“Predictive analytics and Network Digital Twins are changing the way digital utilities make business decisions as the benefits of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning are recognized across the industry,” said Sean Moser, Senior Vice President of Product Management for GE Digital’s Grid Software business. “Management of vegetation in transmission and distribution corridors is key to providing a reliable supply of electricity to ensure public and worker safety. Our Visual Intelligence solution will provide data-driven insights to reduce operational costs of survey data management, increase reliability and safety, and reduce liability risk.” added Moser.

“The future of operation and maintenance on industrial sites is based on visual data,” said Michael de Lagarde, CEO of Alteia. “Alteia is thrilled to be the provider

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Microsoft attempts takedown of global criminal botnet

Microsoft announced legal action Monday seeking to disrupt a major cybercrime digital network that uses more than 1 million zombie computers to loot bank accounts and spread ransomware, which experts consider a major threat to the U.S. presidential election.

The operation to knock offline command-and-control servers for a global botnet that uses an infrastructure known as Trickbot to infect computers with malware was initiated with a court order that Microsoft obtained in Virginia federal court on Oct. 6. Microsoft argued that the crime network is abusing its trademark.

“It is very hard to tell how effective it will be but we are confident it will have a very long-lasting effect,” said Jean-Ian Boutin, head of threat research at ESET, one of several cybersecurity firms that partnered with Microsoft to map the command-and-control servers. “We’re sure that they are going to notice and it will be hard for them to get back to the state that the botnet was in.”

Cybersecurity experts said that Microsoft’s use of a U.S. court order to persuade internet providers to take down the botnet servers is laudable. But they add that it’s not apt to be successful because too many won’t comply and because Trickbot’s operators have a decentralized fall-back system and employ encrypted routing.

Paul Vixie of Farsight Security said via email “experience tells me it won’t scale — there are too many IP’s behind uncooperative national borders.” And the cybersecurity firm Intel 471 reported no significant hit on Trickbot operations Monday and predicted ”little medium- to long-term impact” in a report shared with The Associated Press.

But ransomware expert Brett Callow of the cybersecurity firm Emsisoft said that a temporary Trickbot disruption could, at least during the election, limit attacks and prevent the activation of ransomware on systems already infected.

The announcement follows