Tag: flaw

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Chastity cage security flaw could let hackers lock up your penis

cellmate

Qiui

A flaw in a smart chastity device that puts your penis on lockdown could get your appendage imprisoned longer than you bargained for, security researchers say.   

The device in question, Qiui’s Cellmate Chastity Cage, encases your favorite organ in a Bluetooth-enabled gadget that a trusted partner can lock and unlock remotely using a mobile app.

The problem, according to security researchers from UK-based Pen Test Partners, is that due to API flaws, a nontrusted party acting from anywhere could not only gain access to precise user location data, but could “prevent the Bluetooth lock from being opened, permanently locking the user in.” 

turnedonnewpromo.png

Click for more on the intersection of technology and sex. 

“There is no physical unlock,” Pen Test Partners noted Monday in a blog post that details its months-long investigation into the device. “The tube is locked onto a ring worn around the base of the genitals, making things inaccessible.”

Qiui did not immediately respond to a request for comment. 

The sex toy company calls the Cellmate the “world’s first app-controlled chastity device.” It’s polycarbonate, comes in two lengths and costs $189 (about £146 or AU$265). 

“Qiui believes that a true chastity experience is one that keeps the wearer away from control over their own devices,” Qiui says on its site.

Of course, there’s surrender of control by choice. Then there’s loss of control by security flaw. 

If the Cellmate falls into the hands of the wrong driver, the only way out would be to cut the wearer free using an angle grinder or other heavy tool that most people would probably prefer be kept away from their sensitive areas. 

This isn’t the first time sex toys have raised security concerns. 

A high-profile

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Apple’s T2 Chip Has Unpatchable Security Flaw, Claims Researcher

Intel Macs that use Apple’s T2 Security Chip are vulnerable to an exploit that could allow a hacker to circumvent disk encryption, firmware passwords and the whole T2 security verification chain, according to a cybersecurity researcher.


Apple’s custom-silicon T2 co-processor is present in newer Macs and handles encrypted storage and secure boot capabilities, as well as several other controller features. In a blog post, however, security researcher Niels Hofmans claims that because the chip is based on an A10 processor it’s vulnerable to the same checkm8 exploit that is used to jailbreak iOS devices.

This vulnerability is reportedly able to hijack the boot process of the T2’s SepOS operating system to gain access to the hardware. Normally the T2 chip exits with a fatal error if it is in Device Firmware Update (DFU) mode and it detects a decryption call, but by using another vulnerability developed by team Pangu, Hofmans claims it is possible for a hacker to circumvent this check and gain access to the T2 chip.

Once access is gained, the hacker has full root access and kernel execution privileges, although they can’t directly decrypt files stored using FileVault 2 encryption. However, because the T2 chip manages keyboard access, the hacker could inject a keylogger and steal the password used for decryption.

According to Hofmans, the exploit can also bypass the remote device locking function (Activation Lock) that’s used by services like MDM and FindMy. A firmware password won’t help prevent this either because it requires keyboard access, which requires the T2 chip to run first.

For security reasons, SepOS is stored in the T2 chip’s read-only memory (ROM), but this also prevents the exploit from being patched by Apple with a software update. On the plus side, however, it also means the vulnerability isn’t persistent, so it

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Enormous Grindr Security Flaw Could Have Let Anyone Reset Your Password and Take Over Your Account

A serious security vulnerability in Grindr, the most popular dating app for gay, bi, trans, and queer people, has been discovered, which could have allowed anyone to infiltrate and take over a Grindr account simply by knowing the account holder’s email address.

As well as making it easy for bad actors to impersonate other people, the vulnerability would have given them easy access to potentially highly sensitive information, including the user’s HIV status, intimate pictures, dating history and sexual orientation.

In a blog post explaining how the vulnerability could be exploited, security researcher Troy Hunt described it as “one of the most basic account takeover techniques I’ve seen,” adding that “the ease of exploit is unbelievably low and the impact is obviously significant.”

He flagged the security flaw to Grindr after being tipped off by French security researcher Wassime Bouimadaghene, who had repeatedly tried to warn the company about it, only for his messages to fall on deaf ears.

Grindr has now fixed the issue, and says it doesn’t believe the vulnerability was exploited by anyone.

How the vulnerability could be exploited

Bouimadaghene had discovered it was possible to take over a Grindr account simply by entering the email address associated with the account into the Grindr password reset tool.

As well as sending a clickable link with password reset token to that email address, Grindr had been leaking the token within the browser, and Bouimadaghene worked out that he could use that to reset the password on any account, without needing to access the user’s email.

Once the password associated with an account was reset, he could easily set a new password and completely take over the account. Troy Hunt confirmed this was the case.

“We are grateful for the researcher who identified a vulnerability. The reported issue has

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

A shameful security flaw could have let anyone access your Grindr account

You would think a dating app that knows your sexuality and HIV status would take thorough precautions to keep that info protected, but Grindr has disappointed the world once again — this time, with a gobsmackingly egregious security vulnerability that could have let literally anyone who could guess your email address into your user account.





Luckily, French security researcher Wassime Bouimadaghene discovered the vulnerability, perhaps before it could be exploited, and it’s now been fixed.

Unluckily for Grindr, the company ignored his disclosures — until security researcher Troy Hunt (of Have I Been Pwned) and journalist Zack Whittaker (of TechCrunch) each confirmed the issue and wrote about it.

The details need to be seen to be believed (so please look at the image below) but the short version is this: if you put an email address into Grindr’s password reset form, it would send a message back to your web browser with the key you need to reset the password buried inside it.



graphical user interface, text, application


© Provided by The Verge


You could then theoretically just copy and paste that key into a password reset URL (which Hunt did), and take over an account just like that.

Loading...

Load Error

Grindr COO Rick Marini told TechCrunch that “we believe we addressed the issue before it was exploited by any malicious parties,” and says Grindr will both partner with a “leading security firm” and introduce a bug bounty program. That should hopefully mean security researchers like Bouimadaghene will have an easier time getting in touch.

Grindr data is particularly sensitive

Again, this isn’t just an app that contains a few messages. Grindr users include gay, bi, trans and queer individuals, and the mere presence of the app on a person’s phone can indicate something about their sexuality they may not want revealed to the

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Grindr flaw allowed hijacking accounts with just an email address

A Grindr vulnerability allowed anyone who knows a user’s email address to easily reset their password and hijack their account. All a bad actor needed to do was type in a user’s email address in the password reset page and then pop open the dev tools to get the reset token. By adding that token to the end of the password reset URL, they won’t even need to access the victim’s inbox — that’s the exact link sent to the user’s email anyway. It loads the page where they can input a new password, giving them a way to ultimately take over the victim’s account.



BERLIN, GERMANY - APRIL 22: The logo of the dating app for gay and bisexual men Grindr is shown on the display of a smartphone on April 22, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)


BERLIN, GERMANY – APRIL 22: The logo of the dating app for gay and bisexual men Grindr is shown on the display of a smartphone on April 22, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)

A French security researcher named Wassime Bouimadaghene discovered the flaw and tried to report it to the dating service. When support closed his ticket and he didn’t hear back, he asked help from security expert Troy Hunt who worked with another security expert (Scott Helme) to set up a test account and confirm that the vulnerability does exist. Hunt, who called the issue “one of the most basic account takeover techniques” he’s ever seen, managed to get in touch with Grindr’s security team directly by posting a call for their contact details on Twitter.

Loading...

Load Error

While Grindr quickly fixed the issue after hearing from Hunt, the incident underscored the platform’s shortcomings when it comes to security. And that’s a huge problem when the dating app caters to individuals whose sexual orientations and identities could make them a target for harassment and violence. This isn’t the first security issue Grindr has had to deal with. Back