Tag: flags

11
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Twitter flags Trump’s false claim about his COVID-19 immunity

By Jason Hoffman and Jordan Valinsky | CNN

Twitter just added a warning label to a tweet from President Donald Trump that claimed, without evidence, he is immune to coronavirus after his physician cleared him to resume public activities.

“A total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday. That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it. Very nice to know!!!” Trump wrote on Twitter Sunday.

He also claimed immunity in an interview on Fox News where he said he believes he will be immune for “maybe a long time, maybe a short time, could be a lifetime.”

There is no evidence that people are immune to coronavirus if they have been infected once, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC specifically cautions people not to assume they are immune.

Twitter’s warning label says the tweet “violated the Twitter Rules about spreading misleading and potentially harmful information related to Covid-19.”

“We placed a public interest notice on [President Trump’s] Tweet for violating our Covid-19 Misleading Information Policy by making misleading health claims about Covid-19,” a Twitter spokesperson said. “As is standard with this public interest notice, engagements with the Tweet will be significantly limited.”

Trump posted the same message on his Facebook account, but the platform hasn’t added a warning label despite the fact that it violates its rules. The post has been up for four hours and shared more than 24,000 times on Facebook.

CNN Business has reached out to Facebook for comment.

On Tuesday, Facebook removed a post from the President’s account after he falsely claimed the flu is more lethal than Covid-19.

Twitter has added this warning label to Trump’s tweets before. Last month, Twitter flagged a Trump tweet about voting twice. And last week, it added a warning

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Watch: Facebook flags onion seed ad as ‘overtly sexual’

Oct. 7 (UPI) — Officials with a Canadian business said they were left surprised, confused and somewhat amused when Facebook refused to run an ad because a photo of onions was flagged as an “overtly sexual image.”

Jackson McLean, a manager at Gaze Seed Company in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, said the company submitted an ad to Facebook to promote its walla walla onions, but the submitted image was rejected by the social media network because the photo, which depicted only a group of onions, was deemed to be “overtly sexual.”

“We got notified the other day that it’s an ‘overtly sexual image’ that they had to ban from the site,” McLean told CBC News. “I guess something about the two round shapes there could be misconstrued as boobs or something, nude in some way.”

McLean said he had to laugh at what was apparently an error by Facebook’s anti-nudity algorithm.

“I just thought it was funny,” he said. “You’d have to have a pretty active imagination to look at that and get something sexual out of it … ‘Overtly sexual,’ as in there’s no way of mistaking it as not sexual.”

The company appealed the decision, and a Facebook Canada spokeswoman confirmed the ad’s rejection was an algorithm error.

“We use automated technology to keep nudity off our apps, but sometimes it doesn’t know a walla walla onion from a, well, you know,” the spokeswoman, Meg Sinclair, told The National Post. “We restored the ad and are sorry for the business’ trouble.”

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Samsung Flags Near-60% Operating Profit Jump After Huawei Boost

Samsung Electronics flagged a leap of nearly 60 percent in third-quarter operating profits Thursday, as its mobile and chip business were boosted by US sanctions against its Chinese rival Huawei.

The South Korean tech giant said in an earnings estimate that it expected operating profit to reach 12.3 trillion won ($10.6 billion) for July to September, up from 7.8 trillion won in the same period last year.

The prediction would represent the firm’s biggest operating profit of any quarter for two years and was also ahead of analyst forecasts.

Samsung Electronics is crucial to South Korea’s economic health. It is the flagship subsidiary of the giant Samsung group, by far the largest of the family-controlled conglomerates known as chaebols that dominate business in the world’s 12th-largest economy.

Its overall turnover is equivalent to a fifth of the country’s gross domestic product.

James Kang, senior analyst at Euromonitor International Korea, said Samsung’s rollout of its latest premium handset devices — the Galaxy Note 20 and the Galaxy Z Fold 2 — in August, coupled with strong sales of mid-range phones, led the firm’s third-quarter performance.

A Washington ban on foreign companies providing Huawei with US-origin technology, that came into effect on September 15 — cutting off essential supplies of semiconductors and software needed for making smartphones and 5G equipment — also provided a boost.

Kang Min-soo, an analyst at Counterpoint Research, said US sanctions against Huawei were becoming “a big factor” affecting the global smartphone market.

“For Samsung, it will be a good opportunity to increase market share in Europe, where it has been competing with Huawei in various price bands,” he added.

The firm’s memory business also benefited from the feud after Huawei rushed to stock up on Samsung-made semiconductors before the US restrictions kicked in.

“Huawei has stocked about

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Samsung Electronics Flags 58.1% Jump In Q3 Operating Profit

Samsung Electronics flagged a nearly 60 percent rise in third-quarter operating profits Thursday, largely driven by strong smartphone sales boosted by US sanctions against its rival Huawei.

The South Korean tech giant said in an earnings estimate that it expected operating profit to be 12.3 trillion won ($10.6 billion) for July to September, up from 7.8 trillion won in the same period last year.

The prediction was in line with analyst forecasts.

Samsung was projected to post around 10.3 trillion won ($8.9 billion) in third-quarter operating profit, according to market researcher FnGuide.

Samsung Electronics is crucial to South Korea’s economic health. It is the flagship subsidiary of the giant Samsung group, by far the largest of the family-controlled conglomerates known as chaebols that dominate business in the world’s 12th-largest economy.

Its overall turnover is equivalent to a fifth of the country’s gross domestic product.

Analysts say the firm’s strong third-quarter performance was largely led by its mobile business, which enjoyed a boost from US sanctions on Huawei.

A Washington ban on foreign companies providing Huawei with US-origin technology came into effect on September 15, cutting off essential supplies of semiconductors and software needed for making smartphones and 5G equipment.

Samsung Electronics is crucial to South Korea's economic health Samsung Electronics is crucial to South Korea’s economic health Photo: AFP / Jung Yeon-je

Kang Min-soo, an analyst at Counterpoint Research, said US sanctions against Huawei were becoming “a big factor” affecting the global smartphone market.

“For Samsung, it will be a good opportunity to increase market share in Europe, where it has been competing with Huawei in various price bands,” he added.

Looking forward, analysts said falling chip prices could put a damper on Samsung’s performance in the final quarter of the year.

Samsung is the world’s biggest manufacturer of memory chips and led the DRAM market with 43.5-percent share

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Watch: Facebook flags onion seed ad as ‘overly sexual’

Oct. 7 (UPI) — Officials with a Canadian business said they were left surprised, confused and somewhat amused when Facebook refused to run an ad because a photo of onions was flagged as an “overtly sexual image.”

Jackson McLean, a manager at Gaze Seed Company in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, said the company submitted an ad to Facebook to promote its walla walla onions, but the submitted image was rejected by the social media network because the photo, which depicted only a group of onions, was deemed to be “overtly sexual.”

“We got notified the other day that it’s an ‘overtly sexual image’ that they had to ban from the site,” McLean told CBC News. “I guess something about the two round shapes there could be misconstrued as boobs or something, nude in some way.”

McLean said he had to laugh at what was apparently an error by Facebook’s anti-nudity algorithm.

“I just thought it was funny,” he said. “You’d have to have a pretty active imagination to look at that and get something sexual out of it … ‘Overtly sexual,’ as in there’s no way of mistaking it as not sexual.”

The company appealed the decision, and a Facebook Canada spokeswoman confirmed the ad’s rejection was an algorithm error.

“We use automated technology to keep nudity off our apps, but sometimes it doesn’t know a walla walla onion from a, well, you know,” the spokeswoman, Meg Sinclair, told The National Post. “We restored the ad and are sorry for the business’ trouble.”