Tag: falls

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Ethereum Miners’ Revenue Triples Thanks To DeFi, Bitcoin’s Falls

KEY POINTS

  • Ethereum was more profitable to mine than Bitcoin in September 2020
  • Mining revenues soared because of the excitement over decentralized finance
  • As DeFi excitement wanes, observers are watching closely the launch of Ethereum 2.0

During the month of September, revenue from mining Ethereum has eclipsed that of Bitcoin’s thanks to the excitement surrounding decentralized finance (DeFi).

According to the data from analytics firm Glassnode, miners in the Ethereum network collected 450,089 ETH worth $168.7 million. This is a 39% increase from the previous month’s total of $113 million, Cointelegraph reported.

In contrast, miners in the Bitcoin network netted only $26 million in September, which is a decrease from the $39 million they earned the previous month. This effectively makes mining Ethereum more profitable than mining Bitcoin.

The increase in miner revenue came from the community’s excitement over decentralized finance (DeFi).

Several DeFi protocols and tokens made headlines last month. YFI, the governance token of Yearn.finance reached its all-time high of $43,678 on Sept. 12. That’s twice the all-time high of Bitcoin in 2017. Other noteworthy DeFi tokens that made headlines last month include UNI, the token of automated market maker UniSwap, and Sushi, the token of on-chain protocol SushiSwap.

Uniswap made headlines for dropping at least 400 UNI to anyone who used the Uniswap protocol prior to September 1. At one point, each UNI was worth $8, which meant anyone who received 400 UNI immediately had $3,200 in one day. 

DeFi without a doubt has renewed the demand for Ethereum. As more users want to get a piece of the DeFi tokens, the price of each transaction fee has ballooned. Cointelegraph noted that at one point, a standard transaction on Ethereum hit at least $15 on average. The publication said this is good in the short-term, as the

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Staying connected when the world falls apart: How carriers keep networks going

To Mike Muniz, an area manager for AT&T’s network disaster recovery team, witnessing the aftermath of Hurricane Michael was like entering a war zone.

On Oct. 10, 2018, two days after forming over the Caribbean Sea, Hurricane Michael made landfall in the Florida Panhandle. The most powerful hurricane to hit the US since Andrew in 1992, the Category 5 Michael killed 45 people, left 700,000 residents across Florida, Georgia and Alabama without power and caused $25 billion in damage.

Muniz arrived in Mexico Beach, Florida, a couple days later to help restore the area’s cell service, which the storm had wiped out.

“I look back, I think it was worse than Puerto Rico [after Hurricane Maria in 2017],” Muniz says. “I remember seeing people just wandering around.”

Following disasters that topple cellphone towers or knock entire networks offline, wireless providers need to be on top of their game when repairing them, especially as more Americans ditch landlines completely for their smartphones. Beyond providing a vital way for survivors to stay connected to loved ones and contact 911, reliable networks are also critical for receiving emergency alerts and staying informed of local conditions and recovery efforts. Likewise, emergency personnel need to plan and coordinate efforts to save lives and rescue people in danger.

AT&T teams work to restore service after Hurricane Michael. 

AT&T

While exact times will vary based on each situation, the company plans to have services restored within hours of being mobilized.

However long it takes, Muniz and his colleagues face exhausting work when managing disaster recovery, and they’re likely to be busy in the weeks ahead. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, which has broken records with 25 named storms as of early October, won’t officially close until Nov. 30. Hurricane Delta, currently in the Gulf of Mexico,