Tag: Fail

12
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Website fail puts ASX monopoly under scrutiny

“This [incident] highlights how important it is for consumers to have access to information,” Mr Matheson said. “Market data is critical, it should not be a monopoly.”

He said Australia should consider re-regulating the ASX’s stranglehold over company announcements, similar to reforms in the UK which allow companies to choose between a range of organisations to lodge mandatory disclosures with, such as newswire services.

ASX client and broker OpenMarkets agreed the incident drew attention to the ASX’s problematic monopoly status. “The industry is concerned that ASX has too much power to dictate play and there isn’t much of an opportunity for competitors to create a diverse environment that will ultimately benefit customers,” said chief executive Ivan Tchourilov.

However, he said the market operator was right to make changes to its previous archaic website and that these long-term benefits for investors would outweigh the “unfortunate teething problems”.

John Daly, chief executive of markets information provider Listcorp, similarly had sympathy for the ASX, noting it was a “huge challenge” to launch a new website. “We’re happy to help keep investors informed while the ASX beds down their new site,” he said, having stepped in to publish all company announcements on the Listcorp website ahead of a busy week of annual general meetings.

But many individual investors were unconvinced that the website changes were for the better. “The new site hides share prices and company stats behind a login,” said one regular ASX visitor. “How is that a better user experience?”

Others speculated that the new login requirement may be commercially motivated on the part of the ASX, with fears that personal data may be sold or passed on to third parties.

An ASX spokesman clarified that there is no commercial model associated with the website and that revenue previously garnered from advertising

11
Oct
2020
Posted in website

New ASX website’s epic fail

The new Australian Securities Exchange website has made a chaotic debut – freezing, crashing and failing to show company announcements – prompting market watchers to vent spleen on social media.

The site has a sleeker look than the old one but has far less at-a-glance market data on its home page, with the standard ASX 200 prices list seemingly axed.

A company spokesman recommended users set up their own personal watchlist instead.

As the trading session opened, the bourse tweeted: “ASX announcements are currently not displaying on the ASX website. All company announcements are available to view via brokers and news agencies.”

“Huge fail for the @ASX,” @eadatt tweeted.

@SmallCapEagle labelled the new website “atrocious” and implored: “Kindly put the old one back.”

“The new website is a disaster! One can no longer easily see that there is a company announcement relevant to a particular security on their watchlist, there are no longer ‘sector comparisons’ on the page of a particular security, the feedback page or investors page won’t open …” @cnboston wrote.

Another user wrote: “Where is the multiple price search on the new website? Can anyone point me in the right direction? Help!”

Shareholder activist Stephen Mayne was also critical.

“The old ASX website had an archive of every listed company announcement back to 1998 – the new version launched over the weekend starts at 2016. Let’s hope they fix this – fast,” he wrote.

Source Article

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Without Compliance, DeFi’s Napster Moment Is Doomed To Fail

When most people in the crypto universe imagine what a crypto trader looks like, they imagine a high-flying, government-fearing, algorithm-loving fanatic trading on a cutting edge DeFi platform. The trader wants to swap three ETH for some BAT to maximize investment yield based on an algorithm he believes is impervious to market trends. Unbeknownst to the trader, the major source of liquidity to the pool comes from the proceeds of the Mt. Gox hack, the sale of blood diamonds or heroin. Otherwise stated, the trader has accidentally stepped into a money laundering cesspool by accident.

Flash forward one year. The same trader, conducting the same transaction, has maximized his yield and now seeks to deposit his gains into a traditional bank that has started accepting crypto, or even, G-d forbid, a centralized exchange. Ultimately, the goal was always and continues to be to cash out into fiat. 

Sadly, the trader finds out that all of his accounts are frozen.

In this hypothetical scenario, law enforcement and regulatory authorities have collaborated and filed a lawsuit alleging money laundering. Exchanging crypto on the DeFi platform that the trader used for the transaction has been blacklisted, and all wallets that have interacted with it have been red-flagged.

A question for another day is whether a fully DeFi exchange (DEX) actually exists or whether – despite the name – all exchanges have some form of centralization. For this hypothetical, we’ll concede that a centralized exchange has a Board of Directors and/or responsible shareholders, while a DEX has users who purchase governance tokens, run nodes, and vote on protocol changes.

The example above is a potential road that might become a simple realty in the future. Or is it? The nature of both centralized and decentralized exchanges, or virtual asset

29
Sep
2020
Posted in computer

Computer Systems Fail At Major Hospital System After Ransomware Attack

Computers at Universal Health Services facilities — which has more than 400 locations, primarily in the U.S. — began to shut down over the weekend in what is described as one of the largest medical cyberattacks ever.


NBC News:
Major Hospital System Hit With Cyberattack, Potentially Largest In U.S. History


A major hospital chain has been hit by what appears to be one of the largest medical cyberattacks in United States history. Computer systems for Universal Health Services, which has more than 400 locations, primarily in the U.S., began to fail over the weekend, and some hospitals have had to resort to filing patient information with pen and paper, according to multiple people familiar with the situation. (Collier, 9/28)


Wired:
A Ransomware Attack Has Struck A Major US Hospital Chain 


An emergency room technician at one UHS-owned facility tells WIRED that their hospital has moved to all-paper systems as a result of the attack. Bleeping Computer, which first reported the news, spoke to UHS employees who said the ransomware has the hallmarks of Ryuk, which first appeared in 2018 and is widely linked to Russian cybercriminals. Ryuk is typically used in so-called “big-game hunting” attacks in which hackers attempt to extort large ransoms from corporate victims. UHS says it has 90,000 employees and treats about 3.5 million patients each year, making it one of the US’ largest hospital and health care network. (Newman, 9/28)


USA Today:
Health Care Provider United Health Services Hit With Cyberattack


The King of Prussia, Pennsylvania-headquartered health care giant’s operations include 26 acute care hospitals, 328 behavioral health facilities and 42 outpatient facilities across the U.S., Puerto Rico and the U.K. No data belonging to patients or employees “appears to have been accessed, copied or misused,” the company said in its statement. “We implement extensive IT