Tag: faces

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Exclusive: Google faces new antitrust case in India over abuse in smart TVs market

By Aditi Shah and Aditya Kalra



a screen shot of a man: FILE PHOTO: Man stands in front of a screen during a Google event in New Delhi


© Reuters/Adnan Abidi
FILE PHOTO: Man stands in front of a screen during a Google event in New Delhi


NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Alphabet Inc’s Google is facing a new antitrust case in India in which the U.S. tech giant is alleged to have abused its Android operating system’s position in the smart television market, a source and two lawyers involved in the case told Reuters.

The case is Google’s fourth major antitrust challenge in India, one of its key markets where it is currently facing public criticism from local startups for enforcing certain policies and company charges they contend hurt their growth.

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It also comes as Google faces new antitrust challenges in the United States, and a potential antitrust probe in China that is set to look into how it allegedly uses its dominance of its Android mobile operating system to stifle competition. Google has denied any wrongdoing.

The Competition Commission of India (CCI) has since June been looking into allegations that Google engages in anti-competitive practices by creating barriers for firms wanting to use or develop modified versions of Android for smart TVs, such as Amazon Fire TV’s operating system, according to the source, who has direct knowledge of the case.

The case has been filed by two Indian antitrust lawyers, Kshitiz Arya and Purushottam Anand. They both confirmed the case filing against Google for alleged abuse in the smart television market, but declined to comment further.

The source said the CCI had directed Google to submit its written responses to the allegations and that the company has sought more time.

A Google spokesman declined comment, since the case with the antitrust body was pending. Amazon and the CCI did not respond to requests for comment.

Unlike Indian court cases,

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

The 2 Faces Of Billion-Dollar Entrepreneurship

Billion-Dollar Entrepreneurs (BDEs) are defined as entrepreneurs who have built ventures from startup to more than $1 billion in sales and valuation. Billion-Dollar Entrepreneurship (BDE-ship) is defined as the process used by BDEs to build these ventures. This blog explains the difference between the two faces of BDE-ship.

Glam Face: The business press loves to talk about the glam side of entrepreneurship and business schools love to teach it. This includes:

·     Shark Tanks and Pitch Competitions: This is where glamorous judges and investors supposedly pick winners for investments based on a few minutes of presentation. Given that sophisticated VCs wait for Aha, which is real proof of potential, do their due diligence, and yet fail on 80% of their deals, it would be interesting to see audited data to evaluate whether these smart investors on these shark tanks really invest in the ideas they hear and if they do, how do they fare.  

·     Venture Capital with its tales of instant fame, glamor and wealth where 20-something entrepreneurs use capital from super-smart financiers who can predict the future. In the VC world, glam counts. The opportunity needs to reek with potential and the entrepreneurs need to be stars – or they will be replaced by CEOs who are stars. And even with all this agglomeration of talent, VCs fail on 80% of their investments and their funds succeed only if they have a home run. Could this be one reason why only 20 VCs (you read that right, it is 20, not 20%) are said to earn about 95% of VC profits (and this is from one of the most

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Airbnb faces calls for stricter enforcement of rental rules in Ireland

View of Ha’penny bridge on bright sunny day in Dublin, Ireland.

Stricter enforcement on Airbnb and short-term lettings in the Republic of Ireland are needed to protect the housing and rental market. 

That’s according to housing activists and opposition politicians that believe regulations introduced last year need to be bolstered ahead of the difficult months and years ahead for the economy.

Last July, regulations around short-term rentals came into effect with a “one host, one home” model that is enforced by local planning authorities.

Eoin O’Broin, a member of parliament and housing spokesperson for Sinn Féin, the main opposition party, told CNBC that the regulations are sound but fall down when it comes to enforcement as the planning system is a “very slow and laborious process.”

For Airbnb hosts renting out a room in the home that they themselves live in, there was little change.

However, for people renting out second homes, holiday homes and other properties that aren’t their primary residence, they are required to obtain a “change of use” planning approval from their local authority. The regulations were introduced to encourage more properties back onto the long-term market. Rising rent costs in cities like Dublin have been a difficult policy issue as the average rent in the capital has risen to 1,709 euros ($2,010), compared to 1,252 euros in the same quarter five years ago.

However there has been a low number of short-term let planning applications filed with authorities despite the number of listings remaining high, as hosts avoid the lengthy application process.

“We always knew the regulations, even if they were good, would fall foul of weak enforcement if it was left to the local authorities. That’s not a criticism of the councils, it’s just the nature of planning enforcement,” O’Broin said.

Ireland’s Department of Housing,

04
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Business leaders call for urgent reforms as global economy faces its ‘worst state in a century’

  • On Monday, business leaders under the Business Twenty group made 22 policy recommendations for the G-20 group.
  • Each recommendation fell into three key areas: empowering people, safeguarding the planet and shaping new frontiers.



a close up of a store


© Provided by CNBC
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Top business leaders say the global economy is facing its worst crisis in a hundred years, and “downside risks remain elevated” unless urgent reforms are enacted during the G-20 summit hosted by Saudi Arabia in November.

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“The global economy is in its worst state in a century,” warned Yousef Al-Benyan, chairman of Business Twenty (B20), a group made up of high-level CEOs from around the world. “The challenging opportunity is to build back better, with real urgency required from policymakers and business leaders,” he added.

Business Twenty is an engagement group that seeks to represent the voice of the global business community across all member states and economic sectors in the Group of 20.

The group is urging G-20 leaders to undertake “bold and broad based” policy action to put the post-pandemic economic recovery on a stronger, more stable growth path. It said trade tensions, policy uncertainty, geopolitical strains and building financial vulnerabilities were key risks to the outlook, as societies and economies navigate the crippling impact of the coronavirus.

“As the economic recovery evolves over the next couple of years, downside risks remain elevated,” Al-Benyan said, raising concern about low productivity growth and rising inequalities. 

“Business has its share of responsibilities to honor and a substantial role to play in building back an economy that is socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable,” he added.

Saudi Arabia will be the first country in the Middle East and North Africa region to host a G-20 summit. The event brings together the leaders of the largest economies of the world to address financial