Tag: expand

14
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

9 ways to expand computer science equity in high school

Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught

(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)

Almost half of U.S. high schools now teach at least one computer science course. That means, however, students at a majority of high schools don’t have access to computer science, according to a new report.

And Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught, according to “State of Computer Science Education: Illuminating Disparities” by Code.org, the Computer Science Teachers Association, and the Expanding Computing Education Pathways Alliance.

Students from rural areas and economically disadvantaged backgrounds are also less likely to have a chance to take computer science.

Students in these underrepresented groups are also less likely than are white and Asian American teeens to attend a school that offers an advanced placement computer science course or to an AP test in the subject.


More from DA: Why a district launched a middle school for African American girls


And even though female students remain underrepresented in high school computer science courses, the number of students taking AP computer science exams has been growing rapidly, the report found.

Disparities would be better illuminated if schools measured disparities by determining computer science participation by students’ specific race, ethnicity and economic status, rather than by the general term “underrepresented minorities,” the report found.

The report also recommended nine policies states and districts can implement to provide equitable access to computer science:

  • Create a state plan for K–12 computer science
  • Define computer science and establish rigorous K–12 computer science standards
  • Allocate funding for rigorous computer science teacher professional learning and course support
  • Implement clear certification pathways for computer science teachers
  • Create programs at institutions of higher education to offer computer science to
29
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Fujitsu to expand Western Sydney data centre

Connection network in dark servers data center room storage systems 3D rendering

Image: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Fujitsu has announced the expansion of its Western Sydney data centre, increasing its initial capacity by 20 megawatts.

The first phase of expansion, called Western Sydney 2, will involve the addition of 4,500 square metres of technical area with the new data halls expected to be operational by March 2021.

Fujitsu said the expansion is part of a broader hyperscale expansion plan, with further phases at the Western Sydney data centre to add another 14,000 square metres and over 50 megawatts of increased power capacity.

This would bring the combined total capacity to 90MW at the Homebush Bay campus.

See also: Fujitsu teams up with Vault Systems to go after government cloud

“Fujitsu’s investment will deliver new levels of data centre resilience and control over their infrastructure for Fujitsu’s customers using dedicated halls,” the company said.

“Based on Fujitsu’s new standardised modular design, the Western Sydney data centre infrastructure design principles will also be aligned to future expansion at Fujitsu’s other data centre sites in Australia, offering customers greater flexibility in terms of increased density, scale, and speed of deployment.”

The company is also touting the expansion as supporting 1,300 jobs throughout the construction process.

Fujitsu has six data centre facilities in Australia: Homebush Bay and North Ryde in New South Wales; Noble Park in Victoria; Eight Mile Plains in Queensland; and Malaga in Western Australia.

The Australian data centres are part of a network of 140 Fujitsu data centres around the globe.

Earlier this month, Fujitsu Laboratories announced the development of a facial recognition technology that uses conventional cameras to successfully identify efforts to spoof authentication systems. This includes impersonation attempts in which a person presents a printed photograph or an image from the internet to a camera.

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