Tag: energy

13
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

COVID-19 testing site at Alliant Energy Center reopens, long lines reported

Coronavirus graphic

MADISON, Wis. — The COVID-19 testing site at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison temporarily closed Tuesday afternoon.

The Dane County Sheriff’s Office tweeted about the closure around 1 p.m. citing a computer issue.

About an hour later, the agency sent another tweet saying the computer system was up and running again, but slowly.

Testing resumed with the computer system back up, but long lines were reported.

Dane County deputies are allowing people to park and wait if they choose, the post said.

Source Article

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Australia’s telco and energy sectors agree to boost infrastructure resiliency

Communications Alliance and Energy Networks Australia (ENA) have signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) to improve the way the two sectors collaborate and share knowledge when responding to emergency situations.

Under the MoU, the pair have agreed to improve the safety of communities by mitigating risks caused by telecommunications or power outages during emergencies, as well as the sustainability of telecommunications and power supply services to communities affected by emergencies to support their recovery.

The MoU also sets out that the two sectors will collaborate and coordinate on preparing telecommunications and electricity networks and infrastructure for responding to emergencies at local, regional, and state level.

A report prepared by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) in May found that during the peak period of the Black Summer bushfires, most telecommunication outages were due to power failures rather than direct fire damage to communication assets.

The report found that during the period from 19 December 2019 to 31 January 2020, only 3% of tower outages were due to fire damage, and of the 1,390 total facilities that were impacted by the fires outages, only 1% of incidents were a direct result of fire damage.

See also: Twitter bots and trolls promote conspiracy theories about Australian bushfires  

Similar findings were disclosed by the company responsible for deploying the National Broadband Network (NBN) across Australia. In June, NBN revealed in response to Senate Estimates Question on Notice that bushfires impacted 1% of all NBN services.

“12% (or 6,367 services) of all services impacted were directly impacted by fire over the duration of the bushfires,” the company said at the time.

“The remaining services were impacted by power outages as a result of the bushfires.”

The federal government has previously announced it would spend AU$37.1 million to improve the resiliency of the nation’s

01
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Does Tesla’s Battery Day Mean Energy Storage Manufacturers Must Become Miners?

The world is electrifying at a rapid pace and the mining industry seems to be becoming a quiet but key player in the electrification process. Tesla’s
TSLA
recent ‘Battery Day’ announcements only highlight the incredible challenges facing the electricity storage market, and raise significant questions about how the market will evolve.

We know that demand for energy storage is surging to meet increasing demand for renewable energy and electrified transport. According to Maria Xylia at Sweco Sweden, only 3% of global capacity can be currently stored and energy demand itself is expected to increase over 50% to 2050. Storage is a fundamental necessity for the integration of renewables into a smoothly running and efficient energy system, and it needs to be cost-effective, high performance and safe.

As Dr. Young-hye Na, Manager, Materials Innovations for Next-Gen Batteries, IBM Research says, “Enabling better battery energy storage will be key to a successful energy transition to renewables and net-zero carbon emissions. While lithium-ion batteries have advanced significantly by cutting cost and improving energy density for the last decade, it is still too expensive to be widely adopted for EV and renewable applications, and heavy metals that are needed to make these batteries – ex. cobalt and nickel – have brought environmental concerns associated with their invasive and energy intensive mining.”

Tesla’s ‘Battery Day’ left experts somewhat puzzled. There had been high expectations of breakthrough announcements but the company laid out future plans for building its own batteries and its own supply chain, and for massively ramping up production to 2030. The company announced a new cell design which could cut battery costs in half but it’s yet ready. It can take up to ten years for a battery to move from the lab to commercial production. For an audience expecting significant change, it