Tag: Employees

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Employees To Get Permanent Work From Home Through Summer 2021

KEY POINTS

  • 90% employees don’t want to a rigid office schedule: Dropbox’s internal survey
  • Employees can make their own schedules in the new ‘virtual first’ policy
  • Dropbox will set up collaboration spaces called ‘Dropbox Studios’ 

Cloud services company Dropbox is allowing its employees to work from home permanently, as part of its new ‘virtual first’ approach, it announced Tuesday in a blog post.

All employees of Dropbox have been working from home since March when the pandemic triggered lockdowns. This mandatory work-from-home policy has now been extended until June 2021. The change comes after an internal survey by the company suggested that nearly 90% of employees feel productive at home and don’t want to return to a rigid five-day in-office workweek.

Dropbox is the latest to join technology companies including Microsoft, Twitter, Slack, and Facebook to announce permanent work-from-home policies.

“Remote work will be the primary experience for all employees and the day-to-day default for individual work,” Dropbox said in the blog post.

With the coronavirus pandemic upsetting the conventional work culture around the world, Dropbox is using the opportunity to introduce changes to its internal working.

In the blog post, the company said it would be changing its current offices into flexible co-working spaces — Dropbox Studios — designed especially for collaboration rather than solo work. The utilization of the co-working spaces in San Francisco, Seattle and Austin, and Dublin in Ireland, will depend on the teams’ needs. More co-working spaces could be set up if they turn out to be successful.

The company is also introducing ‘non-linear workdays,’ allowing employees to make their own schedules between time zones beyond Dropbox’s core collaboration hours. Dropbox will also facilitate employees’ relocation to other cities where it has offices.

“As our workforce grows more distributed, this will help balance collaboration with

11
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Silicon Valley is famously liberal. Then, investors and employees started clashing over race.

SAN FRANCISCO — The day after President Donald Trump told the Proud Boys, a far-right group with a history of inciting violence, to “stand back and stand by,” during the first presidential debate last month, tech investor Cyan Banister tweeted that the group had “a few bad apples. “

The open defense of an organization that has been deemed a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center is one extreme example of an increasingly public reactionary streak in Silicon Valley that diverges from the tech industry’s image as a bastion of liberalism. Some libertarian, centrist, and right-leaning Silicon Valley investors and executives, who wield outsize influence, power and access to capital, describe tech culture as under siege by activist employees pushing a social justice agenda.

Curtis Yarvin, dubbed a “favorite philosopher of the alt-right” by the Verge, has become a familiar face on the invite-only audio social network Clubhouse, in rooms with investors such as Facebook board member Marc Andreessen, the founder of Andreessen Horowitz, which invested in the app.

Cryptocurrency startup Coinbase recently sought to restrict political speech by employees, a move many interpreted as a return to the company’s more libertarian roots because it came in reaction to internal discussions of Black Lives Matter.

Tensions are running high even at some of the biggest tech companies. The crackdown on employee speech in response to social activism over the past year has spread to Facebook, Google and Pinterest, among others.

In September, Facebook restricted spaces for political discussions after employees protested the company’s moderation policies against hate speech affecting Black users. Pinterest shut down a Slack channel used to submit questions for company meetings and turned another Slack channel read-only, opting to use a different tool for up-voting. Employees, who had used both channels to question leadership about

11
Oct
2020
Posted in software

How much Unity pays its employees: salaries, job listing

Unity paid a Lead Backend Engineer in California a salary of $225,000

An Oculus Quest all-in-one VR device is shown in an undated 2019 photo released by Facebook January 22, 2020. Facebook/Handout via REUTERS

Oculus Quest all-in-one VR device.

Reuters


Engines require engineers. A majority of the jobs Unity hired for from overseas candidates were engineering positions. These workers help determine the broad swath of what Unity’s software can do. Some were common positions in software development, like backend engineers who work behind the scenes. Others were more idiosyncratic, like a “Robotics Simulations Engineer.”

Backend Engineer: $140,000 – $117,770

Backend Engineer, Monetization: $140,000 – $117,770

Backend Software Engineer, Golang: $159,000 – $137,259

Dev Ops Engineer: $120,000 – $81,141

Engineering Manager: $175,000 – $160,701

Full Stack Engineer, Monetization: $140,000 – $119,122

Full Stack Engineer, Monetization Engineering: $165,000 – $137,259

Lead Backend Engineer: $225,000 – $156,749

Lead engineer: $140,000 – $117,770

Lead Virtual Reality Engineer: $190,032 – $153,795

Machine Learning Engineer: $160,000 – $113,381

Machine Learning Graphics Engineer: $165,000 – $140,670

Robotics Simulations Engineer: $130,000 – $104,291

Senior Data Engineer, Monetization: $205,000 – $168,958

Senior Engineer, Monetization: $200,000 – $156,749

Senior Software Development Engineer in Test: $190,000 – $156,749

Senior Software Engineer, Machine Learning: $185,210 – $137,259

Software Development Engineer in Test: $175,600 – $153,795

Software Development Engineer in Test, Cloud Live Production: $150,000 – $124,134

Software Development in Test, Platform Foundation: $190,200 – $156,749

Software Engineer: $158,000 – $101,546

Software Engineer, Backend: $150,000 – $122,824

Software Engineer, Data: $142,000 – $117,770

Software Engineer, Desktop: $120,000 – $101,546

Software Engineer, Distributed Systems: $132,000 – $82,000

Software Engineer, Machine Learning: $167,500 – $122,824

Software Engineer, Monetization: $145,000 – $117,770

Software Engineer, Monetization DevOps: $140,000 – $117,770

Staff Data Engineer, Monetization: $200,000 – $156,749

UI Tools Engineer: $135,000 – $101,546

Source Article

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

‘Crisis of integrity:’ Some Facebook employees say they’ve had enough

Alongside a picture of his Facebook employee badge and a drawing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Adin Rosenberg posted a lengthy note Monday explaining why he was leaving the company.

“These past years working on Messenger and Instagram have helped me grow personally and professionally, and I look back at them with many fond memories,” Rosenberg wrote in a Facebook post. “However, recently I’ve been feeling a growing sense of disillusionment.”

Rosenberg, who had been a software engineer for almost six years before leaving, is one of a now-steady trickle of Facebook employees who have left in recent months and made clear that they do not see the company as a force for good.

“As a result of the company’s obsession with its growth, so many things go wrong,” Rosenberg, who did not respond to a request for comment, wrote.

Other Facebook employees who have left have offered similar sentiments. Ashok Chandwaney left Facebook last month after more than five years as an engineer working in various departments.

“It’s very clear to me after everything that’s happened, that Facebook’s work has life and death consequences,” he said in an interview. “I did not believe there was a way while working there that I could help move the company to take more seriously some of these really critical issues.”

Chandwaney said he did not raise his concerns internally until he had given his two-week notice. He said he loved the work and his colleagues but explained he was forced to leave because the company “is choosing to be on the wrong side of history.”

In recent months, at least four employees have quit in protest, each posting a message to their colleagues on their way out. Others who still work at the company have spoken out anonymously for fear of retaliation.

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Can AT&T’s Employees Teach The Company A New Form Of Public Responsibility?

South side neighborhood support in Chicago, homelessness in Dallas, and diversity in media in L.A. — Americans know our cities need help, but do we know who’s helping? Community organizations, churches, state agencies, social entrepreneurs all spring to mind. What about a global telecommunications, media and entertainment company? In cities across the U.S., AT&T employees are taking initiative to make change in their own communities, and they are bringing their teams along. Could a major corporation find its place in the already-rich ecosystem of changemaking? Is it an organic new form of employee-led citizenship, beyond the familiar tricks and traps of CSR? Ashoka caught up with Hardmon Williams, VP of AT&T BelievesSM, and Michael Peterson, VP of AT&T External Affairs, to find out how one of the country’s most powerful corporations learned to lead from behind.

Ashoka: What’s the core idea of AT&T Believes and how did it come about?

Hardmon Williams and Michael Peterson: Believes is a unique approach AT&T has taken as a company. Instead of making CSR policy at the top, we are letting employees identify the issues that matter most in the places where they live and work. It started in Chicago in 2018. Employees came together and asked what they could do for south side communities suffering from inner-city violence. It was happening in their neighborhoods, places of worship, schools. Their concerns were real, and their interest was credible. But we are a tech and media company, and our people have expertise in those areas. So, we had to find the right collaborators who had experience with addressing the local issues.

Throughout 2019, we rolled out that basic model — following our employees’ lead then