Tag: Email

11
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Inbox zero: 5 email hacks and keyboard shortcuts from an email expert

  • Professionals spend an average of 28% of their workday on emails, according to a McKinsey analysis, amounting to almost three hours every day.
  • The entrepreneur Rahul Vohra has spent most of his career trying to improve email and launched the email app Superhuman in 2014.
  • Vohra gave us his five tricks to get to inbox zero and boost productivity.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Professionals spend 28% of their working day reading and answering emails on average, according to a McKinsey analysis. For the average full-time worker in America, that amounts to 2.6 hours and 120 messages per day.

Rahul Vohra is the CEO and founder of Superhuman, a subscription email app that promises a faster, streamlined experience. Superhuman is popular in Silicon Valley, counting execs from firms such as Slack, Spotify, and Dropbox among its clients.

Vohra is a two-time founder in Silicon Valley and has been figuring out how to make email better since 2010, when he launched Rapportive, an earlier version of Superhuman that sold to LinkedIn in 2012. 

While working at LinkedIn, Vohra noticed many professionals didn’t read most emails to save time, he said. So in 2014, Vohra launched Superhuman, raising a total of $33 million in funding over four rounds. In 2019, the email software quadruped its business and hit $20 million in revenues, according to Forbes.

Read on to see Vohra’s five tips to boost email productivity and get to inbox zero.

Learn email keyboard shortcuts

It’s worth Googling for the most common email shortcuts for whichever software you use. Gmail and Outlook, for example, have pages dedicated to shortcuts. “You need to use an email client that has world-class keyboard shortcuts,” Vohra said. 

Free software won’t have a vast set of shortcuts, but most have ways to quickly star,

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Twitter locked President Trump’s account after he shared NY Post columnist’s email

Twitter said that it locked President Trump’s account on Monday after the commander-in-chief violated company policies by sharing the email address of a New York Post columnist in a chirp.

The social media giant confirmed to the Daily News on Tuesday that the coronavirus-stricken President’s account was locked until the post was removed.

Twitter’s privacy information policy states that users are not allowed to post other people’s private information without their consent.

The White House didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

A chirp from Trump’s @realDonaldTrump account posted Monday was plastered over with the message: “This Tweet is no longer available because it violated the Twitter Rules.”

In his next visible tweet, at 6:23 p.m. on Monday, Trump declared: “Will be back on the Campaign Trail soon!!! The Fake News only shows the Fake Polls.”

President Trump has continued to use his favored social media platform throughout his bout with COVID-19. His severe case of the virus landed him in Walter Reed military hospital for three nights. He returned to the White House on Monday.

Twitter also concealed a Tuesday morning post from the President that claimed the flu carries higher fatality rates than the novel coronavirus in most populations. The app said the tweet violated its misinformation rules; the post remained on Trump’s timeline behind a disclaimer.

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©2020 New York Daily News

Visit New York Daily News at www.nydailynews.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Grindr flaw allowed hijacking accounts with just an email address

A Grindr vulnerability allowed anyone who knows a user’s email address to easily reset their password and hijack their account. All a bad actor needed to do was type in a user’s email address in the password reset page and then pop open the dev tools to get the reset token. By adding that token to the end of the password reset URL, they won’t even need to access the victim’s inbox — that’s the exact link sent to the user’s email anyway. It loads the page where they can input a new password, giving them a way to ultimately take over the victim’s account.



BERLIN, GERMANY - APRIL 22: The logo of the dating app for gay and bisexual men Grindr is shown on the display of a smartphone on April 22, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)


BERLIN, GERMANY – APRIL 22: The logo of the dating app for gay and bisexual men Grindr is shown on the display of a smartphone on April 22, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)

A French security researcher named Wassime Bouimadaghene discovered the flaw and tried to report it to the dating service. When support closed his ticket and he didn’t hear back, he asked help from security expert Troy Hunt who worked with another security expert (Scott Helme) to set up a test account and confirm that the vulnerability does exist. Hunt, who called the issue “one of the most basic account takeover techniques” he’s ever seen, managed to get in touch with Grindr’s security team directly by posting a call for their contact details on Twitter.

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While Grindr quickly fixed the issue after hearing from Hunt, the incident underscored the platform’s shortcomings when it comes to security. And that’s a huge problem when the dating app caters to individuals whose sexual orientations and identities could make them a target for harassment and violence. This isn’t the first security issue Grindr has had to deal with. Back

29
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Email Aliases Not Functioning Properly in iOS 14 [Update: Possibly Fixed in iOS 14.2 Beta 2]

Email aliases in the Mail app don’t appear to be functioning correctly in the iOS 14 update, according to multiple customer complaints on the MacRumors forums and the Apple Support Communities.


Affected customers have set up aliases in the Mail app for subscriptions, account signups, and more, as aliases are useful for concealing a primary email address and limiting unwanted messages. Those aliases are not working as intended as of the ‌iOS 14‌ update, with the Mail app on iPhone and iPad ignoring the preferred alias that’s selected when sending an email.

There appears to be no way for affected users to successfully control which alias is selected, leading to emails sent from unwanted addresses. A member of the Apple Support Communities describes the problem:

I have an IMAP account (not gmail) with a few aliases. I have been using this for YEARS and it’s always worked fine. Today, I sent my first email from ‌iOS 14‌ and it changed my from address after I sent the email. Note, the correct address was selected in Mail – it was changed during sending. I then sent some mails from other aliases, and those were also all wrong – never the right address.

I then double checked on my ‌iPad‌, and the same thing occurs. For now, I have just removed all aliases.

Many of the complaints are from iCloud users who are using aliases with Apple’s ‌iCloud‌ mail service, including those who have an older @mac.com or @me.com alias available to use with their @iCloud.com email addresses. Apple’s Mail app appears to default to the @iCloud.com email address instead of the properly selected @mac.com that some users prefer. From the MacRumors forums:

One of the few who still uses @mac.com for the email address. After the upgrade I am noticing that