Tag: driving

13
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

This hot take on iceberg lettuce is driving a wedge through the internet

As anyone who lives in Los Angeles will tell you, iceberg lettuce seems to be on the outs while kale still has a hold on the gourmet restaurant community.

For every trendy restaurant that serves avocado toast, there’s another that serves some sort of high-end kale salad with several expensive garnishes. Whole Foods even sells T-shirts with just the word “kale” on them.

A recent opinion piece from Bloomberg pointing out the shifting tides in the lettuce world, however, has brought out some serious opinions on the topic and it turns out there are still plenty of iceberg devotees.

The story, appropriately titled “America Has Lost Its Taste for Iceberg Lettuce,” argues that this year could be the year romaine and other leaf lettuce “finally surpasses that of head lettuce, which is mostly iceberg lettuce.”

That same article also says it might not…which is fair, given the state of the world in 2020, nothing really seems all that predictable anyway.

But opinion columnist Justin Fox forges ahead, pointing out kale is grown in every state in the country — yes, even Alaska.

We also can’t overlook other greens like spinach and romaine, which are also having a moment.

“Such greens are generally perceived as health foods; and, well, affluent people like to buy health foods (if not necessarily eat them),” Fox writes. “Maybe turnip greens will have their big moment next!”

As Americans can argue about everything, not everyone agrees the country has “lost its taste” for old-fashioned heads of lettuce. The divisive story earned some interesting responses on Twitter from both sides.

One person clapped back to the Bloomberg headline, writing people are done with the longtime fan favorite “Because iceberg lettuce is just crispy water.”

04
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Worldwide Drug Modeling Software Industry to 2027 – Increasing Adoption of Modelling Tools in Drug Discovery is Driving Growth

DUBLIN, Oct. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The “Drug Modeling Software Market Forecast to 2027 – COVID-19 Impact and Global Analysis by Product type; Application, and Geography” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

According to this report the global drug modeling software biopharmaceutical market is expected to reach US$ 11,299.85 million by 2027 from US$ 6,205.22 million in 2019; it is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 8.1% from 2020 to 2027. The report highlights the trends prevalent in the global drug modeling software market, and the drivers and deterrents pertaining to its growth.

Based on product type, the drug modeling software market is segmented into database, software, and others. In terms of product type, the software segment held the highest share of the drug modeling software market in 2019 and is estimated to register the highest CAGR of 8.4% in the market during the forecast period. The growth of the market is attributed to the growing demand for effective therapeutics and increasing number of drug discovery efforts of various biologics across a wide range of therapeutics. Additionally, strategic activities by service providers such as collaborations, product advancement, and product launch in order to expedite drug discovery timeline are further accelerating the growth of the market.

The market growth is also attributed to a few key factors such as increasing adoption of in-silico modeling tools in drug discovery, and rising economic burden of drug discovery. However, less adoption in emerging countries is expected to hamper the growth of the market up to certain extent during the forecast period.

Crown Bioscience Inc.; Chemical Computing Group Ulc; Nimbus Therapeutics; Schrdinger, Inc.; Dassault Systmes; Genedata Ag; Biognos Ab; Compugen Ltd; Acellera ltd.; and Leadscope, Inc plc are among the prominent players operating in the drug modeling software market. The market players

01
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

These are the top bankers, lawyers, and capital providers driving the $40 billion SPAC craze

One of Wall Street’s most talked-about trends is the wave of special-purpose acquisition companies, or SPACs, that have launched IPOs at such a torrid pace that they’re on track to raise more than triple last year’s totals.



a group of people walking in front of a building: One-hundred and twelve SPACs, aka "blank-check firms," have raised more than $40 billion so far this year. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson


© REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
One-hundred and twelve SPACs, aka “blank-check firms,” have raised more than $40 billion so far this year. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

One-hundred and twelve SPACs, aka “blank-check firms,” have raised more than $40 billion so far this year, according to the website SPAC Research. There are now 183 shell companies with $57 billion to spend on bringing other companies public, the data provider said.

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There’s an entire ecosystem of advisers, salespeople, and lawyers increasingly pitching blank-check companies to investment platforms and wealthy people. Asset managers like Fidelity, T. Rowe Price, and Capital Research are also increasingly participating in the market, lending an additional aura of respectability to what had once been considered a back corner of the financial markets.

Historically, SPACs have been used as an alternate way into the public markets for companies that didn’t have the governance threshold to attract investors in a traditional IPO, or a last-ditch effort for investors to exit their stake. The traditional process requires filing a prospectus, engaging with the SEC and facing scrutiny from discerning investors.

Video: Despite AOC call for probe, Peter Thiel-backed tech firm goes public, hits $22B valuation (Fox Business)

Despite AOC call for probe, Peter Thiel-backed tech firm goes public, hits $22B valuation

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Inevitably, that meant the deals didn’t always work out well and the market had a history of failures and occasional cases of fraud. In 2005, for example, the SEC removed some protections afforded other entities after some of the shell companies were implicated in fraud, according to a Harvard Law