Tag: digital

14
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Three Ways Software Development Companies Drive Digital Acceleration

As VP of Operations at BairesDev, Damián is responsible for the entire customer relations life-cycle, safeguarding the company’s operations.  

The concept of digital acceleration (clearly a child of digital transformation) has grown exponentially in the past couple of weeks. Nothing unexpected, considering the huge demand for technology solutions that the novel coronavirus pandemic generated on a worldwide scale. Nonetheless, as most businesses moved digital transformation to the top of their to-do list, many have stumbled upon the harsh reality of technology adoption: It takes crucial know-how to do it right. 

Working with software development companies has become one clear long-term solution for this dilemma. The industry knowledge, expertise and technology capabilities they bring to the table often just can’t be matched by in-house operations. And, what’s more, outsourcing IT services has proven to be a faster and more cost-effective way of developing high-quality products, even in industries as complex as healthcare. 

So, can software development companies be the answer to your digital acceleration process? Let’s answer that question by taking a look at three roles they play in this framework. 

1. Technology Discovery And Adoption

Digital transformation is a lot more than moving legacy processes into the digital realm. It requires a detailed analysis of the needs, context and opportunities of an organization and its people. Only then can you hope for some form of digital transformation. With acceleration in the mix, things are a little different. 

When time is of the essence, software development companies play a crucial role in technology discovery and adoption. Simply put, they show up knowing what’s working in the market right now and, based on your information, are able to determine whether that would work for you, too. 

In my experience, this happens a lot with artificial intelligence, cloud computing and data

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Governments are using the pandemic to crack down on digital rights, report finds

In their fight against the coronavirus, some governments are introducing digital surveillance and data collection tools that could pose a lasting threat to citizens’ rights, according to a new report by research institute Freedom House.



People wearing face masks as a preventive measure against the Covid-19 (novel coronavirus) scan a QR code (C) with their smartphones to check their "Health Kit" to enter an area on a street in Beijing on October 13, 2020. (Photo by NICOLAS ASFOURI / AFP) (Photo by NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP via Getty Images)


© Nicolas Asfouria/AFP/Getty Images
People wearing face masks as a preventive measure against the Covid-19 (novel coronavirus) scan a QR code (C) with their smartphones to check their “Health Kit” to enter an area on a street in Beijing on October 13, 2020. (Photo by NICOLAS ASFOURI / AFP) (Photo by NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP via Getty Images)

The Freedom on the Net 2020 report, an assessment of 65 countries released Wednesday, found that the pandemic has accelerated a decline in free speech and privacy on the internet for the tenth consecutive year, and accused some governments of using the virus as a pretext to crack down on critical speech.

“The pandemic is accelerating society’s reliance on digital technologies at a time when the internet is becoming less and less free,” said Michael J. Abramowitz, president of Freedom House, which is funded by the US government. “Without adequate safeguards for privacy and the rule of law, these technologies can be easily repurposed for political repression.”

Amid the pandemic, internet connectivity has become a lifeline to essential information and services — from education platforms, to health care portals, employment opportunities and social interactions. But state and nonstate actors are also exploiting the crisis to erode freedoms online.

Nowhere has that approach been more apparent than in China, according to Freedom House, which rated the country worst for internet freedom for a sixth year in a row.

Since the coronavirus outbreak emerged in Wuhan last December, China has deployed every tool in its internet control arsenal — from digital surveillance, to automated censorship, and systematic arrests — to

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

China hands out $1.5m of digital currency in cashless society trial

  • Authorities in Shenzhen, southern China, have handed out $1.5 million of a new digital currency as part of a trial of a cashless society.
  • Last Friday authorities gave 50,000 lottery winners the equivalent of $30 each to spend digitally by October 16, the state-run China Daily reported Monday.
  • The digital currency is not like a cryptocurrency, and is issued and controlled by China’s central bank, the People’s Bank of China.
  • The PBoC said it plans to formally launch the digital payment system in late 2020, according to the BBC.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A Chinese city has handed out 10 million yuan, or $1.5 million, in digital currency to trial what citizens would do in a cashless society.

On Friday, 50,000 people living in the Luhou district of Shenzhen were given digital “red envelopes,” each containing around 200 yuan ($30) worth of the digital currency, the state-run China Daily reported Monday.

The digital currency not a cryptocurrency, like bitcoin or ethereum, but a digitized version of the country’s renminbi currency that is run by China’s central bank, the People’s Bank of China.

The country’s four largest state-owned banks are taking part in the Shenzhen trial, China Daily reported.

The trial requires people to download the government’s digital currency app and spend their money between October 12 and October 16 in 3,000 participating stores in the district, CNBC and China Daily reported. One of those participating stores is Walmart, CNBC reported, citing the Shenzhen government.

FILE PHOTO:  A woman wearing a mask walks past the headquarters of the People's Bank of China, the central bank, in Beijing, China, as the country is hit by an outbreak of the new coronavirus, February 3, 2020. REUTERS/Jason Lee/File Photo/File Photo

A pedestrian walks past the headquarters of the People’s Bank of China in Beijing on February 3, 2020. The PBoC is in charge of issuing the digital currency.

Reuters


So far, around 113,300 such digital currency apps — or “digital currency wallets” — have been set up in various pilot programs across China,

13
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Leading Software Industry and Digital Transformation Experts Unveil BizOps Manifesto

BOSTON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The BizOps Coalition, which advocates for fundamental change in the way business and IT collaborate in modern software development, today announced its BizOps Manifesto, a new framework designed to connect technology investments to business outcomes.

Leaders across industries have learned that too often, software investments are not tied to business outcomes. A recent survey revealed that 78 percent of respondents said the disconnect between IT and business units results in significant costs[1]. This misalignment often creates waste and hinders productivity and innovation.

“The harsh, ‘new normal’ reality requires a significant focus on connecting business metrics and outcomes to every IT product and project. To accomplish these objectives, IT leadership teams require pragmatic operating models and frameworks that reduce business risks and increase operational and team efficiencies,” said Stephen Elliot, program vice president, Management Software and DevOps at IDC. “IT and business leaders who adopt BizOps have a great opportunity to win now, drive more team collaboration, deliver business outcomes, and thrive in the future.”

The BizOps Coalition

The BizOps Coalition is focused on the advancement and adoption of the BizOps methodology. In addition, the group provides thought leadership, education and best practices BizOps strategies via the bizops.com platform. 

Founding members and BizOps Manifesto authors include Dr. Mik Kersten, founder & CEO of Tasktop; Serge Lucio, vice president and general manager of the Enterprise Software Division, Broadcom; Patrick Tickle, chief product officer, Planview;  Sally Elatta, CEO of AgilityHealth; Evan Leybourn, CEO of Business Agility Institute; Tom Davenport, distinguished author and professor; Dave West, founder of Scrum.org Kevin Surace, chairman/CTO of Appvance.ai and many others.

“BizOps helps improve development cycles, streamline business operations, and ultimately, accelerates digital transformation for many organizations,” said Serge Lucio

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

How Digital Technology Could Lead The ‘New Business Normal’ In Latin America

Managing Director & Founder of the Biz Latin Hub Group.

The most significant technological advancements that currently shape our society and economy have emerged from challenging times. The internet, for example — without which our daily life as we know it would be possible — emerged in light of the Cold War, after the United States Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and MIT scientists invented a method to prevent communications from being affected in the event of an attack.

According to the UN, a report from the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean found that the Covid-19 pandemic is expected to result in the loss of 8.5 million jobs in Latin America and the Caribbean. It has produced new realities through which life and business have managed to get ahead. Digital technology has proven to be the great ally of humanity, facilitating the adaptation of economies and businesses to the “new normal,” a term that is commonly overused and yet mostly still unknown.

Currently, I expect the technology sector in Latin America to grow considerably, as it appears to be a key solution for businesses to evolve with changing social and economic contexts brought about by this pandemic. Technology stands as an industry that could lead the region’s “new business normal.”

The digital revolution is a call for Latin American business resilience.

After governments in the region announced measures to counteract the contagion of the virus, companies of all sizes have reportedly started realizing the importance of digital technology for applications like e-commerce. Technology enables them to adapt to a new business ecosystem in which interacting with clients can no longer be the same.

As I expected, the industries of e-commerce, streaming services, online education and health, food delivery and technological financial services (fintech) have grown