Tag: development

07
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Supreme Court takes on Google vs. Oracle: The biggest software development case ever

Thanks to the coronavirus pandemic and other issues, the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) will finally hold oral arguments in Google v. Oracle on Oct. 7, 2020. This case will decide, without exaggeration, the future of software development and billions of dollars.

Seriously. 

As the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) states, “allowing copyright on APIs is a terrible idea for computer science.” That’s because almost all modern software depends on open APIs. When your web browser works with Amazon, Apple, Microsoft — any complex site really — it communicates through APIs. When your smartphone shows you the weather, directions to your doctor’s office, or a video, it uses APIs to bridge the gap between services and servers and your devices. 

That’s the theory. Developers see the reality of the threat. Hannu Valtonen, chief product officer at Aiven said: 

It’s clear that an Oracle win would not be in the best interest for the software community as a whole. For startups like ours, an Oracle win would change the ability to be compatible with third-party applications and partners, as companies would have to create entirely new, but similar, APIs rather than use what already exists in the market. It would also make the current competition between tech giants much more cutthroat, as companies could potentially block the use of an API without payment and become “gatekeepers,” therefore fracturing the software environment. From an end-user standpoint, many organizations investing in software understand the need for neutral platform partners that promote successful and open innovation. An Oracle win could change this significantly, setting the software industry back a decade.”

And, it goes on and on. 

Oracle argued Google had infringed Oracle’s copyright, by copying the “structure, sequence, and organization” of 37 Java APIs into Android. Google replied that an API is like

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Toyota Racing Development Uses Data To Outpace Competition Using AWS Analytics

A subsidiary of Toyota Motor North America, Toyota Racing Development (TRD) has over 40 years of experience in motorsports, competing across multiple platforms, including the NASCAR Cup Series. Before 2015, TRD had focused the majority of its resources on engine development and engineering endeavors. But, sensing the growing impact that software and data could have, the company began an initiative to capture and analyze data to outpace the competition. For the past 5 years, TRD has used Amazon Web Services (AWS) to build more than 20 applications that collect historical competition data, current vehicle data, and current practice data. The insights gleaned from that data helped the company achieve NASCAR Cup Series manufacturers’ championships in 2016, 2017, and 2019 and drivers’ championships in 2015, 2017, and 2019.

But to continue to stay ahead of the competition, TRD had to squeeze more insights out of its data. “Over the years we had accumulated an awful lot of data,” says Jonny Elliott, TRD’s senior engineering manager of technology. “But it was disparate, and it wasn’t really providing value.” Looking in each application for key information—including engine data, race images, and brake data—also consumed time that TRD couldn’t afford to lose. In racing, milliseconds matter, and even moments of downtime can cost a race.

So the company again turned to AWS to bring data together in its core data platform. TRD has begun to migrate all the data to the repository, where it will be able to easily and quickly perform analytics. This data repository brings the company’s siloed applications into one centralized location, enabling the team to find the important information needed to make snap decisions during races. TRD then analyzes data using Amazon Athena, a serverless interactive query service. It also uses Amazon Kinesis Data Streams (Amazon KDS), a massively

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

L3Harris, SpaceX win Space Development Agency contracts to build missile-warning satellites

SDA Director Derek Tournear said SpaceX “came in with an extremely credible proposal” that leverages the Starlink assembly line

WASHINGTON — The Space Development Agency awarded  $193.5 million to L3Harris and $149 million to SpaceX to build four satellites each to detect and track ballistic and hypersonic missiles.

The contracts announced Oct. 5 are for the first eight satellites for a potentially much larger constellation of sensor satellites the Space Development Agency is calling Tracking Layer Tranche 0. 

The awards mark the first time the U.S. military has announced an order of satellites from SpaceX, which opened a factory in Seattle several years ago to produce thousands of small satellites for its Starlink broadband megaconstellation. 

Both SpaceX and L3Harris are required to deliver their satellites by September 2022, Space Development Agency Director Derek Tournear told SpaceNews.

Each satellite will have a “wide field of view” overhead persistent infrared (OPIR) sensor capable of detecting and tracking advanced missile threats from low Earth orbit. The satellites will also be equipped with optical crosslinks to pass data to relay satellites. 

Tournear said the winners were selected based on technical merit and ability to deliver satellites quickly.

SpaceX’s missile-tracking satellite will be based on its Starlink bus with an OPIR sensor acquired from another supplier, Tournear said. He declined to name the payload provider and SpaceX has not disclosed subcontractors for the project.

L3Harris, according to Tournear, bid a complete satellite with the bus and payload produced in-house. 

The optical crosslinks in the Tracking Layer must be compatible with the optical links used in the Transport Layer satellites that Lockheed Martin and York Space Systems are building for the Space Development Agency under contracts awarded in August.

The Transport Layer is the backbone that moves data collected by the sensors to anywhere in the

06
Oct
2020
Posted in software

16 Software Development Trends That Will Soon Dominate The Tech Industry

Every tech professional knows the importance of staying on top of the latest industry trends. From DevSecOps to low-code apps, software development trends change as fast as technology itself. To stay current, you not only need to consider the present state of technology, but you must also look ahead.

As successful tech leaders, the members of Forbes Technology Council study both current and forecasted industry trends. Below, they share 16 software development trends they predict will dominate the technology sector in the months ahead.

1. Low-Code/No-Code Platforms

Low-code/no-code will only continue to rise in popularity. The history of computing is building higher-level abstractions away from the zeroes and ones—from yesterday’s assembly languages and compiled software to today’s modern low-code/no-code solutions. Through these solutions, businesses can move forward in their digital transformation without a technical resource at every step. – David Karandish, Capacity

2. Machine Learning Operations

Machine learning operations are needed to advance to at least a modicum of operational excellence. MLOps includes elements such as automated concept-drift detection (i.e., how does production data differ from the data used to train the model), real-time feedback on key model KPIs in production, and pre-built support for continually updating models based on production success and integration with AutoML. – Sreenivasan Iyer, Shasta Ventures


Forbes Technology Council is an invitation-only community for world-class CIOs, CTOs and technology executives. Do I qualify?


3. User Experience Design

User experience design matters more than ever before. Across every industry, companies are reimagining their customer engagement models to better adjust to the disruption created by the pandemic. User-experience-led software design is critical for redesigning customer-facing products and services in ways that allow companies to retain and recapture business in today’s all-digital environment. – Raj Patil, Orion Innovation

4. DevSecOps

DevSecOps is becoming increasingly concerned about developer

05
Oct
2020
Posted in website

How Long Does It Take to Design a Website? A Complete Website Development Timeline

The way your website looks and functions has a huge impact on user experience and how your brand is perceived. If your website looks like you’re sending visitors back to the ‘90s, it can potentially impact future business. (You hate to see ’em, but they’re still out there.)

Redesigning a website is a great way to refresh branding, features, functionality, and more.

Sure, you might touch up your content here and there to better align with your mission statement, but a full redesign is probably necessary every few years (if you’re not making incremental changes and updates along the way).

This is exciting! You finally committed to revamping your site, but now you realize you’re missing a major piece of the puzzle – an in-house designer and developer. Or perhaps the designers you do have just don’t have the time or can’t quite do what you want.

It’s time to call up an outsourced web designer.

What Is Website Design and Development?

via GIPHY

Web design refers to the process of creating the visual aspects of a website, such as the layout, colors, graphics, and text font.

It also includes the design aspects that provide the users with an excellent experience, which means a web designer should make sure the site is navigable and aesthetically pleasing.

Web development refers to building the backend of a site. This includes all of the coding and maintenance of a site that contributes to the performance of the website to ensure a great user experience. Web developers make sure a website is fast and responsive.

Both website design and development require experienced professionals to carry out web creation tasks successfully.

5 Benefits of Outsourcing Website Design and Development

It Gives You Access to Top Talent.

Your budget may not allow you to hire the