Tag: decide

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

PS4 update lets parents decide which games kids can and can’t chat in

Sony is giving the PlayStation 4 one more big update before the PS5 arrives, and it’s particularly good news for parents. A version 8.00 update releasing today makes multiple additions, including simpler and more adaptable parental controls. Limits on communication and viewing user-made content are now lumped together to make it “easier for parents to understand.” Crucially, kids can now ask for permission to use communications in specific games — you can make an exception if you know a young one will be talking to friends.

Not everything is positive. The 8.00 update removes user-made events and the creation of private communities. You can still use private communities that already exist, but they’ll clearly dwindle without the option to make more. Sony hasn’t explained the move, but we’ve asked for comment.

There are more additions that might offset that decision. Party and Messages are now more closely connected, with a new interface that uses the same groups for party voice chats and messages. Two-factor authentication finally supports third-party authenticator apps during activation as well as sign-ins across PS4, mobile apps and the web. And you can finally mute all mics from the Quick Menu — you don’t have to wade through menus (if your headset doesn’t have a mute switch) just to take a quick break from the action.

Sony is also updating its Remote Play apps for phones and computers to enable PS5 connections, although that clearly won’t be useful until the new console’s November 12th debut.

You might not want to rush to update to 8.00 when there are reports (albeit a handful) of party and friend issues. We’ve asked Sony about those as well. Even so, it’s hard not to be at least a bit sentimental about this update. While there will likely be other revisions, this

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

TIkTok hired former China diplomat to decide on ban policies: FT

  • A former diplomat for the Chinese government was head of TikTok’s global content moderation team for two years, the Financial Times reported. 
  • Cai Zheng was a diplomat at the Chinese embassy in Iran prior to taking up the post at TikTok. 
  • The company has long maintained that Beijing influences its content moderation policy. The FT reported that Cai is not a Chinese Communist Part ideologue. 
  • Cai’s time at TikTok coincides with numerous instances of the suppression of topics such as LGBTQ issues, Tibetan independence and even users deemed too “ugly” to be seen on the main page. 
  • A TikTok spokesperson told Business Insider that Cai was not involved in devising its early policies but oversaw efforts to localize them internationally. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

TikTok hired a former Chinese diplomat to oversee its global content policy unit, which decided what content should be allowed on the short-form video app, according to the Financial Times (FT). 

Cai Zheng worked in China’s embassy in Iran for four years prior to taking up the role at TikTok, a post he held until early this year, the FT reported.

During his tenure, the company was criticized for restricting LGBT content in some countries, and also posts about Uighur Muslims,a minority group being monitored and incarcerated en masse in western China.

Cai was part of the company’s global trust and safety team in Beijing and wrote guidelines for what users can post on TikTok and other apps, two people close to the company told the FT.

His background will likely add to scrutiny of the relationship between TikTok and the Chinese authorities. The app, and its parent company ByteDance, have repeatedly denied that Beijing has influence over its content.

Sources close to the company argued that Cai’s role is not proof of

04
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

This multimillion dollar CA ballot measure could decide the future of gig work

Sam Harnett:

Absolutely. So, you know, this the issue that’s playing out in California over where, how to classify these drivers is playing out in every other state in the country and actually global and different in different countries around the world. So everyone is looking to California to see what’s going to happen.

Now, the thing is that the way the propositions were written is that it only applies to people working on platforms, doing delivery or transportation companies like Uber, Lyft, also Postmates, DoorDash.

So it’s limited in who it’s targeting now. But if you create this precedent of having a basic third option between employee and contractor, this kind of contractor, and we didn’t explain this, but the proposition would give them contractor status with slightly improved benefits, slightly better wages, some health supplements, some insurance to drive a certain amount of hours. So the point is, if you create that third category, the worry is that a bunch of other corporations are going to be like, hey, you know, that’s a great way to save money. Let’s maybe create an app for trucking service or delivery service. And then we can instead of paying the workers as employees, we can use the kind of contractor-plus model.

And again, if you look at the history of the company, an independent contractor in America, this was added. The independent contractor model was added as a caveat for various specific kinds of situations. And then you saw corporations over time moving more of their work force from employees, which are expensive because they have protections over the contractors, which are cheaper. So, again, the worry is you make this third kind of third way. And companies are going to find a way to exploit it.

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