Tag: Death

14
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

The death of the internet

It’s too bad that presidential campaigns are so personal, because in truth they’re policy wars. “Who’d you rather have a beer with?” might be easier to answer than “who’s got the better approach to regulating the internet?”, but the latter is far more important.  



Kelly Evans et al. sitting at a table using a laptop computer: CNBC's Kelly Evans


© Provided by CNBC
CNBC’s Kelly Evans

I mention all this because the FCC is set to finalize its repeal of “net neutrality” at the end of the month. Remember “net neutrality”? I certainly do, because of its peculiar premise not so much to address a major existing consumer harm, but to prevent one from coming into being. But even after its repeal, those harms –giving “fast lanes” to certain content and slowing others–haven’t really borne out. The only recent examples I could find were of Sprint reportedly throttling Skype in 2018, and Verizon throttling Santa Clara firefighters for what turned out to be going over their monthly data cap.  

Loading...

Load Error

Ben Thompson, who writes the popular Stratechery columns, got tons of flack for being one of the few Silicon Valley types not to support net neutrality at the time. Not because he, or anyone is against the idea of “net neutrality,” but because, as he wrote at the time, “there is no evidence that harm exists in the sort of systematic way that justifies heavily regulating [internet service providers]…current regulatory structures handle bad actors perfectly well.” 

“Net neutrality,” which reclassified internet providers to subject them to stricter regulation, was passed into law in 2015. It was repealed at the end of 2017, despite dire warnings from the likes of comedian John Oliver, who warned it would be the “death of the internet” and got more than 45,000 comments posted to the FCC website against the move. (And registered the domain name www.gofccyourself.com.) 

AT&T, meanwhile,

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Twitter bans Trump death wishes, sparks debate

Twitter is removing tweets hoping for the demise of US President Donald Trump — a move which opened up the social platform to criticism that it should enforce the same policy for everyone.

San Francisco-based Twitter drew a line on caustic commentary after Trump’s Covid-19 hospitalization Friday, telling users that expressing hope for the death of anyone violates policies against abusive behavior at the one-to-many messaging service.

“Tweets that wish or hope for death, serious bodily harm or fatal disease against anyone are not allowed and will need to be removed,” Twitter said in a post.

Attached was a link to a Twitter policy page that said it does not tolerate content that wishes, hopes, or expresses desire for someone to die or contract a fatal disease.

The post sparked a firestorm of responses from people contending that Twitter has not been consistent about enforcing those rules.

“So… you mean to tell us you could’ve done this the whole time?” Democratic Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York said in a retweet of Twitter’s message.

Conservative Republicans have relentless used social media to spew venom at Ocasio-Cortez, often referred to by her initials AOC.

Fellow Democratic lawmaker Rashida Tlaib chimed in with a similar comment, tweeting, “this is messed up. The death threats towards us should have been taking more seriously.”

Twitter responded with a pledge to be more even-handed.

“We hear the voices who feel that we’re enforcing some policies inconsistently,” Twitter said in response to fierce backlash.

“We agree we must do better, and we are working together inside to do so.”

Trump’s hospitalization for treatment of Covid-19 has been a hot topic on Twitter, with users keen to point out his history of downplaying pandemic risks and safety precautions such as wearing masks.

gc/rl

Source Article

04
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Wishing Trump’s death from COVID-19 not allowed on Facebook, Twitter

gettyimages-1033887648

President Trump’s Twitter page.


Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

As news of President Donald Trump’s positive COVID-19 diagnosis spread, social media companies warned their users that content wishing for the president to die won’t be allowed on their platforms.

After the president revealed on Thursday that he and first lad Melania Trump had tested positive for the virus, many people took to social media to wish him a speedy recovery, but many others said they hoped for the opposite outcome.

A Facebook spokesperson Friday such post violate the social media giant’s user policies and will be removed.

“To be clear, Facebook is removing death threats or content targeted directly at the president that wishes him death, including comments on his posts or his page – in addition to content tagging him,” Facebook spokeswoman Liz Bourgeois said in a tweet

.

Twitter echoed that sentiment, saying Friday night that “tweets that wish or hope for death, serious bodily harm or fatal disease against *anyone* are not allowed and will need to be removed. This does not automatically mean suspension.”

For some time, critics of Twitter have attacked the social network over a perceived failure to respond quickly and appropriately to reports of troubling tweets and harassment on the site. Twitter’s announcement was met with immediate criticism from four Democratic congresswomen known as “The Squad.”

Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, Ilhan Omar

02
Oct
2020
Posted in seo

Why Google’s Search Page Redesign Is the Death of SEO

I have been a digital marketer for more than 20 years, which seems like an eternity at this point. Google has always been a staple of any good digital marketing strategy, especially for search engine optimization (SEO), to attract free organic traffic based on the quality of the content on your page. But, when we recently started to see our SEO traffic start to decline, we asked our SEO consultant to investigate the root cause. He said it was due to a recent Google Search page redesign, moving the free organic links to the bottom of the search results page. Even more troubling was his answer on how to fix the situation.



a close up of a computer


© Bloomberg | Getty Images


“Start spending more money advertising with Google to get back up to the top of the page,” he said. That’s a very strange thing for an SEO expert to say because his services aren’t needed in that scenario. This means SEO as a strategy for ecommerce-driven companies is dying, and paid search marketing has become your primary way to gain an audience through the search engines, at least through industry-leading Google. Allow me to further explain.

Loading...

Load Error

Related: Want to Rank Higher in Google and Amazon Search? This $29 Course Can Help.

A quick history of Google Search

Ever since Google hit the scene in 1998, it has been a staple of any good digital marketing strategy. Originally, it was simply having a good SEO plan to help you go up the free organic rankings — ideally to the top of the first page of the search results. Search results were very straight forward and uncluttered and looked similar to the example below. Only free organic results appeared, based on the content of your page, and its relevancy to the keyword being

30
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

The joke is on consumers as Liquid Death raises $23 million more

In what began as a kind of funny, savvy marketing stunt that has since gained traction, a nearly three-year-old, Santa Monica-based startup that sells water from the Austrian Alps under the brand Liquid Death, has raised $23 million in Series B funding. Backers in the round include an unnamed family office; Convivialité Ventures, which is Pernod Ricard Group’s venture arm; the musician known as Fat Mike; and earlier backer Velvet Sea Ventures.

The company, originally incubated with the help of the L.A.-based startup studio Science, has now raised a little more than $34 million altogether.

We talked with Liquid Death founder Mike Cessario, who was formerly a West Coast agency exec, not long after he launched the company to the public, and he argued at the time that canned water could give sugary energy drinks like Rockstar, Monster and Red Bull a run for their money if it was also named like a heavy metal act.

Indeed, our favorite part of the product has long been its promise to “murder your thirst.” (It’s water in an aluminum can, after all, so other differentiators are hard to come by.)

Clearly, plenty of other people are amused enough by the company’s inventive marketing that its products are selling, including at Whole Foods. It put the cans on its shelves back in February, around the same time that Velvet Sea led the company’s $9 million Series A round.

Liquid Death also sells at more than 1,000 7-Eleven stores in California, and it sells, as it always has, directly to customers, who can select either mountain water or sparkling water, and buy a T-shirt or hoodie from a growing merchandise store on their way out of its online store.

A 12-pack of tallboys costs $16. A “Hydrate or Die” T-shirt can be had for