Tag: data

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Azure Data Explorer gets new engine, numerous enhancements and Synapse integration

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An Azure Data Explorer dashboard


Credit: Microsoft

Today, at a dedicated online event for Azure Data Explorer (ADX), Microsoft is announcing numerous enhancements to the service, including a next-gen release of the underlying engine and an array of integration points that should make it more accessible, more enticing and more useful. ADX, which is most often used for telemetry data lake workloads and analytical solutions as a service, will now run even faster overall than it had, will have numerous optimizations and will connect with a variety of other data services, streaming data sources and data visualization solutions. This will help a service that’s been very successful but not especially well-known, even among Azure analytics experts, achieve more mainstream appeal.

Performance gains galore

What new features are coming to ADX? To start with, Microsoft’s introducing a new version of the core engine (in preview, with GA expected in February), which takes a wholly different strategy to querying data. The Kusto v3 engine will generate multiple versions of the desired query, use the fastest, and compile it to native code before executing, so that it runs at maximum speed. The indexing layer in the v3 engine has also been rewritten. As a result of these changes, Microsoft says queries will run between 2x and 30x faster.

And beyond this raw performance gain, ADX will now offer self-refreshing materialized views, query result set caching and configurable sharding/partitioning. Near real time scoring with machine learning models — including those hosted on Azure Machine Learning as well as those from other platforms, packaged in ONNX format — is being added as well. Fast Fourier Transforms, geospatial joins and polynomial regression are onboarding too. ADX is also getting row-level security capabilities that will make it more appealing to customers who want to support a wide

14
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

How to delete your Facebook account on a computer or phone, and save all your personal data in the process

  • It doesn’t take long to delete your Facebook account on either desktop or mobile.
  • Before you delete your Facebook account, you’ll have the chance to download all your photos, posts, and other data.
  • It can take up to 90 days for Facebook to fully erase all of your data, and if you try to log in within 30 days, you can choose to restore your account.
  • Visit Business Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Whatever your reason is for deleting your Facebook account, accomplishing the task is a bit easier said than done. Facebook has become so ingrained in our culture, that the prospect of deleting your account can be daunting.

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Before deleting your account, you should remember that many apps operate by logging into your Facebook account. It’s important to make sure to sever all those external connections with Facebook, so nothing crashes unexpectedly once your account is gone. Oftentimes, this will mean creating new accounts within your apps.

Last, you’ll likely want to archive all of your photos, videos, and exchanges since you won’t be able to access those once your account is gone. Luckily, Facebook will give you a chance to do this before you delete.

Once you’ve made sure you’re prepared for a life without Facebook, here’s how to delete your Facebook account using your browser or the mobile app.

How to delete your Facebook account from a desktop browser

This is likely your best option since it best allows you to combine the data download process and the actual deletion. But for those who have already downloaded their data, it’s on par with the mobile experience. Here’s how to get it done through your browser:

1. Log into your account.

2. Click the down carrot in the top-right corner and click “Settings

14
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Tufts University to Add New Online Master’s in Data Science and Post Baccalaureate in Computer Science

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Tufts University School of Engineering is collaborating with Noodle Partners, a leading online program manager (OPM), to launch a new online Master of Science in Data Science program and a Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. The programs are expected to launch in January 2021 with classes beginning in Fall 2021. 

Tufts University School of Engineering / Noodle Partners

“We are laser focused on building online programs that help meet the growing demand for data and computer scientists.”

The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA or BS) and one college-level introductory computer course. The program is particularly well-suited for individuals preparing to re-enter the workforce, mid-level professionals looking to move into the field of computer science, and those preparing for graduate school. 

The Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering jointly administer the Master of Science in Data Science, while the Department of Computer Science offers the Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. Students may apply to the post-baccalaureate program or to the post-baccalaureate/master’s combined program in Computer Science. 

“Building on the success of our recently launched Master of Science in Computer Science program with Noodle last fall, these two new programs in Data Science and Computer Science will help meet the soaring global demand for data engineers and computer scientists,” said Jianmin Qu, Dean of the Tufts University School of Engineering and Karol Family Professor. “In this fast-changing learning

14
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Tufts University to Add New Online Master’s in Data Science and Post Baccalaureate in Computer Science | News

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Tufts University School of Engineering is collaborating with Noodle Partners, a leading online program manager (OPM), to launch a new online Master of Science in Data Science program and a Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. The programs are expected to launch in January 2021 with classes beginning in Fall 2021. 

“We are laser focused on building online programs that help meet the growing demand for data and computer scientists.”

The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA or BS) and one college-level introductory computer course. The program is particularly well-suited for individuals preparing to re-enter the workforce, mid-level professionals looking to move into the field of computer science, and those preparing for graduate school. 

The Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering jointly administer the Master of Science in Data Science, while the Department of Computer Science offers the Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. Students may apply to the post-baccalaureate program or to the post-baccalaureate/master’s combined program in Computer Science. 

“Building on the success of our recently launched Master of Science in Computer Science program with Noodle last fall, these two new programs in Data Science and Computer Science will help meet the soaring global demand for data engineers and computer scientists,” said Jianmin Qu, Dean of the Tufts University School of Engineering and Karol Family Professor. “In this fast-changing learning landscape,

14
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

New Game Trains Police To Get Facebook Data Fast When A Terrorist Strikes

When a terrorist strikes, getting information fast from a tech giant can make the difference between police catching the suspects, or another attack taking place. That’s the premise of a new game created by Europol, the European body responsible for connecting the continent’s myriad policing agencies and helping them investigate major crimes.

Right now, police officers are often confused by the process. What data can they request from which provider? Can they retrieve any encrypted content from the likes of Apple or WhatsApp? What legal mechanisms should they be using? What’s the best language to use to ensure they get the information they want quickly?

Who Wants To Be A Millionaire but for fighting terrorists

The game, exclusively shown to Forbes ahead of its release to law enforcement partners and their 4,500 officers on Wednesday, hopes to make sure police know the answers to those when an emergency happens. It looks much like Who Wants To Be A Millionaire but crossed with a create your own adventure game and without the options of phoning a friend or asking the audience. It opens with a hypothetical terror attack in which a gunman has started firing at people on a city street, killing 15 and injuring many others. When the player arrives on the scene, they learn that the suspect has fled but had worn a body camera to livestream the event. The livestream has been found, created by a profile called Bobby Cat.

The player is then offered multiple choice questions about what information they would seek, from what provider and how. Some of the questions are about processes, others are vendor specific, covering data access at established tech firms like Facebook through to newer players like TikTok. The quicker the officer is in getting the relevant data, the more points