Tag: cyberattacks

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Illusive Networks raises $24 million to thwart cyberattacks with honeypots

Illusive Networks, a cybersecurity startup specializing in defense and deception, today announced $24 million in venture funding. The company says the investment will be used to accelerate its next phase of growth, driven by a go-to-market strategy that focuses on sales and marketing expansion, with an emphasis on product enhancements for securing cloud workloads.

Damage related to cybercrime is anticipated to hit $6 trillion annually by 2021, according to Cybersecurity Ventures. Corresponding with this rise, Gartner reports that worldwide spending on cybersecurity is expected to reach $133.7 billion in 2022.

Illusive, which was founded in 2014 by Tel Aviv-based incubator Team8 and Ofer Israel, provides software that detects cyber attackers who penetrate a network while delivering logs to threat intelligence teams. Modular components work together or separately to preempt, detect, and respond to cyberattacks, allowing customers to see their networks as an attacker would and prioritize activity based on risk metrics and the potential business impact.

The Illusive platform lets security teams create credential and connection policies while automatically and continuously detecting and removing violations. It plants deceptions on endpoints — like internet of things devices, network switches, and PCs — that mimic the real data, credentials, and connections attackers need. Attacker choices alert security teams, capture forensics like screenshots and non-volatile system data, and reveal how far the attackers are from critical business assets.


You can’t solo security

COVID-19 game security report: Learn the latest attack trends in gaming. Access here


Illusive’s decoy module enables observation of attacker activity on honeypots that imitate the applications an attacker would target. As for the forensics timeline, it presents a roll-up of incident data in a streamlined, time-stamped, and sortable format. The attacker view management console, meanwhile, shows the proximity of attackers to an organization’s critical business systems.

An Illusive spokesperson demurred

02
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

U.S. patchwork of state, county election computer networks still vulnerable to cyberattacks

WASHINGTON — In a little-noticed episode in 2016, an unusual number of voters in Riverside, California, complained that they were turned away at the polls during the primary because their voter registration information had been changed.

The Riverside County district attorney, Mike Hestrin, investigated and determined that the voter records of dozens of people had been tampered with by hackers. Hestrin said this week that federal officials confirmed his suspicions in a private conversation, saying the details were classified.

Last year, a cybersecurity company found a software flaw in Riverside County’s voter registration lookup system, which it believes could have been the source of the breach. The cybersecurity company, RiskIQ, said it was similar to the vulnerability that appears to have allowed hackers — Russian military hackers, U.S. officials have told NBC News — to breach the voter rolls in two Florida counties in 2016.

RiskIQ analysts said they assess that a vulnerability may still exist in Riverside and elsewhere. The only way to know for sure would be to attempt a hack, something they are not authorized to do. The office of the Riverside County Registrar of Voters did not respond to requests for comment.

“I’m very concerned,” Hestrin said. “I think that our current system has numerous vulnerabilities.”

Officials of the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security have said repeatedly that they have not observed a significant effort by Russian state actors to target election infrastructure this year, and Homeland Security’s top cybersecurity official said this will be the “most protected, most secure” election in American history.

Despite government efforts, however, America’s patchwork of state and county election computer networks remains vulnerable to cyberattacks that could cause chaos on Election Day and undermine confidence in a balloting process that is already under significant strain, election security experts

30
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Microsoft releases Digital Defense Report detailing increasingly advanced cyberattacks

There’s been a surge in cybersecurity activity as companies continue to operate remotely and cybercriminals look to exploit the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

microsoft-digital-defense-report.jpg

Image: Microsoft

To mitigate the spread of COVID-19, organizations around the globe have also adopted remote work policies, leaving companies vulnerable to threats via remote networks, pandemic-related malware, and more. In recent months, there’s been a spike in cybersecurity attacks during the pandemic. In April, the FBI reported cybercriminal activity had increased fourfold. At the time, the agency’s Internet Crime Complaint Center was receiving up to 4,000 complaints per day. On Tuesday, Microsoft released its annual Digital Defense Report providing a glimpse of the trends shaping the cybersecurity landscape during the last year.

“This report makes it clear that threat actors have rapidly increased in sophistication over the past year, using techniques that make them harder to spot and that threaten even the savviest targets,” said Tom Burt, corporate VP of customer security and trust, in the report.

SEE: Identity theft protection policy (TechRepublic Premium)

The Digital Defense Report analyzes cybersecurity threats from the second half of 2019 through the first half of 2020. Overall, Microsoft said it blocked more than 13 billion “malicious and suspicious mails” in 2019, with over 1 billion of these being “URLs set up for the explicit purpose of launching a phishing credential attack.”

From October of last year to July 2020, ransomware existed as the most common action spurring Microsoft’s incident response, per the report. Microsoft notes the ever-evolving and broadening nature of IoT threats, stating that such attacks increased by more than one-third “in total attack volume” when comparing the last six months of 2019 to the first half of 2020.

The findings detail ways in which cybercriminals have attempted to exploit the coronavirus pandemic. For example, a total of 16