Tag: cyber

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Cyber warriors sound warning on working from home

Cyber warriors on NATO’s eastern edge are warning that the growing number of people working from home globally due to the pandemic is increasing vulnerability to cyber attacks.

The Baltic state of Estonia hosts two cyber facilities for the Western military alliance — set up following a series of cyber attacks from neighbour Russia more than a decade ago.

“Large scale use of remote work has attracted spies, thieves and thugs,” Jaak Tarien, head of NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence (CCDCOE), told AFP in an interview.

The increased amount of information travelling between institutional servers and home networks is creating new challenges for employers.

“Tackling these new challenges is complicated and requires a lot of resources as well as a different kind of approach,” Tarien said.

“We are likely only scratching the surface in assessing the magnitude of malicious activities taking place in the Covid-era busy cyberspace.”

An EU-wide survey in September found that around a third of employees were working from home.

– Boom in online courses –

The concerns are echoed at NATO’s Cyber Range — a heavily-guarded facility protected by barbed wire in the centre of the capital Tallinn run by Estonian defence forces.

The server rooms inside serve as a platform for NATO cyber security exercises and training.

“Specialists have set up the work infrastructure, but they cannot control the way people use their home internet or how secure it is,” said Mihkel Tikk, head of the Estonian defence ministry’s cyber policy department.

Tikk said the latest cyberattacks have targeted Estonia’s health sector and Mobile-ID — the mobile phone based digital ID.

The coronavirus pandemic has also affected operations at the cyber facilities themselves, forcing the cancellation of offline exercises.

But the NATO Cyber Defence Centre said the silver lining is the growing popularity

09
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Maximize Your 2020 Cyber Holiday Sales With A Website Checkup

CTO, Partner @ Marena Cosmos overseeing all technical decisions and consulting & advising clients regarding websites & martech. My LinkedIn

The summer sun is setting a lot earlier and you can smell the sweet delicious scent of pumpkin spice lattes (PSLs). Love it or hate it, we all know what it means — the holidays are not far off. Luckily for me, I get to write about the upcoming online holiday sales season that is less than three months away: Black Friday and Cyber Monday. You remember those: pretty big deals and some of the largest shopping days of the year. Cyber Monday shoppers spent a record $9.4 billion in 2019, with a “b,” up 19.7% from a just a year prior, according to information released by Adobe Analytics.

Due to the pandemic, this year has been a struggle for many U.S. businesses. Hopefully, I can help you change that by making some adjustments to your site.

A well-known client of ours (who shall not be named) can receive as much as 30% of their annual sales in the two weeks after Black Friday. After 25 years of accumulating expertise in website e-commerce and software design, I thought I might take a step back and share with you how to best maximize your revenue this 2020–21 Cyber Holiday Season. 

It’s a dirty job, but somebody’s gotta do it … the right way.

Building and maintaining any website, from the smallest to the largest enterprise e-commerce site, can be daunting because a website is arguably the most important foundational technology a business has today. 

That’s right, all you e-commerce store owners, managers and webmasters (yes, they really do still exist, like elves): the big holiday season is much closer than you think. As I write this, it’s three months away

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Marines undergo cyber electronic warfare training

Oct. 6 (UPI) — Marines with I Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group and 1st Force Reconnaissance Company received two weeks of training in tactical cyber electronic warfare recon and survey capabilities last month, the Marine Corp said Tuesday.

The training, which took place Sept. 7 to 18 at California’s Camp Pendleton, was designed to introduce the Marines to newly developed capabilities generated from U.S. Cyber Command and U.S. Marine Corps Forces Cyberspace.

USCYBERCOM and MarkPoint technologies plan to provide this training, which is intended to develop Marines’ ability to map out the digital terrain, for two years under a direct award called Rapidly Deployable Access Capabilities.

The course also supported the development and delivery of future capabilities that address the constantly changing battlefield with the Internet of Things, officials said.

“Getting to work with Marines from other aspects of the Marine Corps is a great opportunity, especially for a junior Marine, like myself,” Lance Cpl. Christopher Brown, a student in the course, and a cryptologic digital network operator from 1st Radio Battalion, I MIG, said in a press release. “This training gives Marines from all job fields the opportunity to come together and learn a new skill set.”

Although electronic warfare is not a new concept, the Marine Corps focuses on innovating, modernizing and finding new ways to employ leading-edge technologies and capabilities.

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02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

The sectors most at risk of cyber attacks

Working from home in a city like Geneva, could save you tens of thousands a year. Photo: XPS/Unsplash
Working from home in a city like Geneva, could save you tens of thousands a year. Photo: XPS/Unsplash

Cyber security is one of the most challenging issues for business owners, with each data breach costing companies about $3.9m (£3m), according to IBM.

With much of the global workforce now remote, it has never been more important for employees to be cyber aware.

However, two in five (41%) of employees across all UK sectors have not received adequate cyber security training, a survey of 1,324 UK workers by Specops Software found.

What’s more, nearly four in five (79%) UK workers admitted they would not be able to identify if they were hacked.

Those in travel and hospitality are at the highest risk of cyber attacks, over four in five (84%) employees not receiving adequate training against cyber threats.

READ MORE: The latest money scams you should be aware of

This is perhaps unsurprising, as it comes shortly after EasyJet was targeted in a serious attack, in which the email addresses and travel details of about nine million customers was breached.

Education and training follows in second place, with seven in 10 (69%) workers claiming they have not been trained sufficiently against cyber threats — a worrying statistic as breaches “compromise student and staff safety”, noted Specops.

In fact, cyber attacks on educational institutions have been increasing annually, as more instances are reported, with attackers motivations including data theft, financial gain, and espionage.

Seperate research by Specops recently found that clickjacking — tricking users into clicking on something other than what they think they are — is the most common form of hacking in education, at 66%.

Meanwhile, phishing — tricking users into revealing personal information through scam emails — was extremely prevalent among other key industries, at 71%.

READ MORE: Two

01
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Second Cyber Attack in a Week Hits Global Shipping Industry

(Bloomberg) — Supply Lines is a daily newsletter that tracks Covid-19’s impact on trade. Sign up here, and subscribe to our Covid-19 podcast for the latest news and analysis on the pandemic.



A vessel loaded with shipping containers is docked at the Yangshan Deepwater Port in this aerial photograph taken in Shanghai, China, on Sunday, July 12, 2020. U.S. President Donald Trump said Friday a phase two trade deal with China isn't under consideration, saying the relationship between Washington and Beijing has deteriorated too much.


© Bloomberg
A vessel loaded with shipping containers is docked at the Yangshan Deepwater Port in this aerial photograph taken in Shanghai, China, on Sunday, July 12, 2020. U.S. President Donald Trump said Friday a phase two trade deal with China isn’t under consideration, saying the relationship between Washington and Beijing has deteriorated too much.

The global shipping industry sustained a second cyber attack within a week that’s raising concern about disruptions to supply chains already straining to move goods heading into the usual peak season for consumer demand.

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The International Maritime Organization, a United Nations agency that serves as the industry’s regulatory body, said in a statement Thursday it has suffered “a sophisticated cyber attack against the organization’s IT systems.” A number of IMO web-based services are currently unavailable and the breach is affecting its public website and internal systems, it said.

That attack followed the disclosure earlier this week by closely held CMA CGM SA, the world’s fourth-biggest container liner by capacity, that its information systems were compromised. The Marseille, France-based company said Thursday that offices are “gradually being reconnected to the network thus improving the bookings’ and documentation’s processing times.”

“We suspect a data breach and are doing everything possible to assess its potential volume and nature,” the company said in an emailed statement. CMA CGM is among the world’s five leading container liners that account for 65% of global capacity, according to Alphaliner data.

A ‘Headache’

A rash of cyber incidents has afflicted the shipping industry in recent years, the biggest of which was an intrusion that cost Copenhagen-based A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S