Tag: Current

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Apple may stop shipping power adapters with iPhone SE, other current devices

Apple is expected to ship new “iPhone 12” models without an AC power adapter, but it could also do the same for previously released devices like the iPhone SE.

The lack of a charging brick in the box is said to be a cost-saving move for this year’s iPhone models. Apple also stopped shipping power adapters with the Apple Watch Series 6, citing environmental reasons.

In a tweet on Tuesday, Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman suggested that the Cupertino tech giant would also stop shipping charging bricks with previously released iPhone models that “it’ll keep selling.”

Although Gurman doesn’t specify, his prediction suggests that Apple will — or already has — change the packaging for current iPhone models to reflect the absence of the charging accessory.

The Bloomberg reporter specified that Apple would nix the power adapter for the iPhone SE, as well as other pre-“iPhone 12” models that it’ll continue selling as part of its updated lineup. At this point, it isn’t clear which current iPhone models will continue to be sold alongside the updated “iPhone 12” lineup besides the iPhone SE.

Additionally, it’s unclear if Gurman’s prediction is simply a guess or actually based on actual leaked information. Gurman didn’t say whether he received the idea from an outside source.

Apple has long been rumored to be pivoting toward wireless charging for its flagship iPhone devices, and analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has forecast that the company could switch to a “completely wireless experience” by 2021. Apple is also rumored to be developing some type of small wireless charging adapter in lieu of AirPower.

The

01
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Survey: Many feel their current internet is too slow and overpriced, yet few have upgraded

Three-quarters of respondents didn’t know what internet speeds would be adequate for their household and the overwhelming majority have yet to upgrade their service.

remote work

Image: iStock/GaudiLab

To mitigate the spread of COVID-19, companies around the globe adopted remote work policies in recent months. At the same time, many schools and universities are conducting classes virtually to ensure the safety of students and staff this fall. Needless to say, this en masse shift to distanced learning and telecommuting has increased the need for high-speed internet for millions. A new survey analyzes consumers’ sentiment regarding their current internet capabilities, bandwidth needs, provider pricing expectations, and more.

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On Monday, HighSpeedInternet.com, a site to explore and compare internet providers,  released a report detailing the results of a recent anonymous US survey involving 1,000 people. Overall, three-quarters of those surveyed did not know the internet speeds their household needed to match current demands. As the author of the report points out, this could explain why almost half (45%) said their current internet is too slow although only one-in-six (16%) have upgraded their internet service plans since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic.

For many, marketplace pricing appears to be playing a role in the decision to forgo an internet upgrade. The majority of respondents, about six-in-ten (61%), believe their current internet plan is overpriced. Nearly half of respondents believe that a “reasonable price” for internet service is in the $20 to $50 range. However, the average cost of monthly internet service is approximately $80, according to the report.

The report notes potential reasons explaining the disparity between the number of people who report having inadequate internet speeds and those who have upgraded their service. For one, the author reasons that

29
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

The Current Tech Stock “Bubble” Reflects Pessimism, Not Optimism

Since the U.S. stock market started its rebound in early April of this year, technology has been the leading sector. Driven initially by mega-cap tech behemoths Amazon
AMZN
, Apple
AAPL
, Facebook, Google
GOOGL
, and Microsoft
MSFT
, the tech rally has spread into some fast growing mid- and small-cap stocks as well as high-profile IPOs like Snowflake. 

Many investors and pundits are concerned that tech stocks are experiencing a bubble, as in 1999‒2000. However, instead of excessive optimism about the future, rising tech valuations may reflect pessimism about future economic growth and profit weakness in other sectors. Given the current high unemployment rate of 8.4% and the large number of small business closures, Consumer Cyclical, Basic Material, and Energy stocks could have muted profits for an extended period. Technology’s secular growth, fueled by the Internet, cloud computing, ecommerce, and the ongoing digital transformation of business, is simply more attractive to investors than most other parts of the market.

S&P 500 overall earnings are expected to decline 3% in 2020 when companies with losses are excluded (see table above). However, Wall Street is optimistic for 2021, expecting a 13% bounce in profits. Many of 2020’s worst sectors are expected to have the highest earnings growth next year. Cyclical groups are expected to have the fastest profit growth, led by Energy (+20%), Transportation (+19%), Consumer Cyclical (+19%), and Basic Material (+18%). In contrast, Technology is only expected to grow roughly in line with the overall market at +14%. Given Technology earnings’ modest expectations and comparatively secular nature, the sector is more likely to meet earnings expectations than cyclical sectors with higher expectations. 

I believe investors are still cautious or negative on the U.S. economy, so they will pay a premium for Technology stocks