Tag: Creators

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

TikTok: Video app asks creators about biggest weaknesses

  • A TikTok survey shown to creators in the app indicates where the company thinks its biggest weaknesses might be.
  • In the survey issued late September, TikTok wanted to know if creators felt they were getting enough views, if they were paid enough, and if they had enough face time with local representatives.
  • It makes sense that TikTok wants to keep its creators happy as competition grows.
  • TikTok faces a squeeze for talent from rival services by YouTube, Instagram, and third parties like Triller.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

You can get a sense of the biggest issues an organization thinks it has by the questions it asks of its users.

Companies often conduct surveys of customers to identify issues — and TikTok is no different.

The social media platform quizzed a select group of its users in late September, and alongside the usual questions about their satisfaction with the app, TikTok also asked some specific questions on topics it seemingly believes are hot button issues among its userbase.

Within an extensive, four-page survey, TikTok asked users what challenges they had encountered when growing and reaching their audience on the app, giving respondents the opportunity to choose three options that were bugbears.

They included concerns that users’ videos are “rarely seen on the For You Page”, that “videos are rarely seen by my followers”, and that “my video views are not consistent.”

Funding is another issue prevalent within the creator community. Since creators can’t sponsor posts with ads, funding for creators mostly comes from TikTok’s own Creator Fund, established by TikTok earlier this year and which came under criticism for low payouts.

It’s an issue TikTok appears to be aware of, too.

The app asked users whether they agreed with a number of statements about their funding experience, including

06
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

The ‘Game Of Thrones’ Creators Finally Talked About The Coffee Cup Mishap That Shook The Internet

Photo credit: HBO
Photo credit: HBO

From Delish

It’s been over a year since a Starbucks cup mysteriously found its way into Winterfell during an episode of the last season of Game of Thrones. The episode, “The Last of the Starks,” featured a scene where the House of Stark allies are celebrating a dramatic victory and a Starbucks coffee cup can be seen in the background…and the creators of the series are finally speaking out about the mishap.

It all went down in May 2019, and though that seems like lightyears ago, the confusion and humor of it all is still fresh as ever. Not only did fans go crazy over the appearance of a coffee cup in the middle of one of the most dramatic episodes by posting and creating memes, but there was so much speculation about who left the cup there in the first place. Spoiler alert: Emilia Clarke once revealed it was Conleth Hill’s, who played Lord Varys.

In an upcoming book by James Hibberd called Fire Cannot Kill A Dragon, showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss talk about the whole incident. The Hollywood Reporter obtained an exclusive excerpt from the book and Benioff said he “couldn’t believe it.”

“When we got the email about it the next day, I honestly thought someone was pranking us, because there had been things before where people were like, ‘Oh, look at that plane in the background!’ and somebody had Photoshopped it in. I thought, ‘There’s no way there’s a coffee cup in there.’ Then when I saw it on the TV I was like, ‘How did I not see that?’”he says in the book.

Weiss then added that they missed it when shooting because they were so focused on everything else: “I’d seen that shot one thousand times, and

05
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

With Equal Access to Internet, Native Creators Could Take Center Stage

“Hey you. Let me teach you something about braids.” Tiktok user @the_land sits facing the camera, brushing his hair and calmly plaiting three strands on either side of his head. He speaks softly and confidently, while words flash on the screen highlighting parts of his speech. “When braiding our hair, we’re supposed to have good thoughts, because we’re connecting with our body, mind, and spirit. That’s what the three strands are for.”

The video, tagged with #nativetiktok and #indigenous, has been shared more than 28,000 times. It’s one of the most popular videos that comes up when you search those hashtags on Tiktok, and @the_land is one of the app’s most prominent Native American creators.

But if everyone had universal internet – and not just access to pricy data plans from their phones, or patchy connections that take forever to load, but clear, high-speed, robust internet access – we would see these TikToks (and Instagram influencers, and YouTube personalities) multiply. As it stands, American Indian reservations and tribal lands have some of the worst internet connectivity in the country. Earlier this year, some tribes weren’t even able to apply for free FCC broadband licences because, ironically, they didn’t have good internet connections, so they couldn’t submit all the application materials online.

And those tribes aren’t just tiny, or rural and isolated. The White Mountain Apache Reservation spans about 2,600 square miles, just a few hours from Phoenix. More than 16,000 people are members, with the majority living on the reservation. About half of those people don’t have reliable internet access, estimates David Fish, the WMAT IT director.

“If you’re willing to pay enough, you can get decent speeds. We have pretty good internet service for the tribal offices, but we pay almost $3,000 a month for it,” Fish said. Residents