Tag: create

13
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Cornell students create Quarantine Buddy website to match friends

“You come on any time,” Benkendorf said from Sunrise, Fla. “I’ve got a dog you can play with. I’ve got a spare room. Anytime you need a vacation. If they close you down again, Stacie, you’re welcome.”

Weldon and Benkendorf have never met in-person, but over the past four months they’ve developed a friendship after matching with each other on a website. Quarantine Buddy, founded by two Cornell University students in April, matches people from around the world based on their background and interests, and they meet virtually.

The website has helped more than 50,000 people — spanning all 50 U.S. states and more than 100 countries — build friendships while stuck at home.

“We kind of realized how lonely and isolating this can be for so many people,” said Jordyn Goldzweig, a Quarantine Buddy co-founder. “The pandemic itself really brought out the fact that a lot of people are isolated, and even though we have technology, people aren’t utilizing it to meet other people. We really wanted to do our part.”

In March, Goldzweig and co-founder Sam Brickman left Cornell for their respective New Jersey and New York homes due to the coronavirus outbreak. A few weeks later, the junior computer science majors met with one of their professors, Pam Silverstein, on Zoom. After discussing a project, Silverstein expressed how thankful she was to speak with someone, because she hadn’t left her house in about a week.

Goldzweig and Brickman have worked on multiple projects together, including an application last year called “Zing” that connects classmates. They expanded that idea to assist people in situations such as Silverstein’s.

They spent two all-nighters shaping the website, staying awake on coffee and electronic dance music. They created a survey with nine questions that allows users to customize what they are looking

12
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Cambridge researchers create VR software that allows scientists to ‘walk’ inside cells

A collaborative project between 3D image analysis software company Lume VR Ltd. and scientists at the University of Cambridge showed off a new virtual reality tool today that gives scientists a new view of the inner workings of human cells.

The researchers hope the Google Street View-style tool will provide an up close and personal way to understand fundamental problems in biology to help new treatments for disease. The details are published in the scientific journal “Nature Methods.”

By using VR, scientists can “walk” through the “byways” and “highways” within the cells themselves and see proteins fold and unfold. They also can potentially see where things go wrong when they go wrong and even rewind biological processes by looking through recorded and visualized datasets.

The software, vLUME, uses super-high-resolution microscopy data that is collected, collated and digested. After that, the data needs to be rendered in a manner understandable by humans, and that’s where the immersive nature of virtual reality comes in.

By donning a VR headset, researchers can then dive into the internal structures of a human cell and look at the structure of a cell wall, a Golgi apparatus (the part of a cell involved in intracellular transport), the warps and waves of a mitochondria (the provisioner of energy) or the folds of an individual protein that could be malformed. They can even pull back to view the roadmap of an entire cell.

“Biology occurs in 3D, but up until now it has been difficult to interact with the data on a 2D computer screen in an intuitive and immersive way,” said Dr. Steven F. Lee from Cambridge’s Department of Chemistry, who led the research. “It wasn’t until we started seeing our data in virtual reality that everything clicked into place.”

The team from Lume specialized originally in

12
Oct
2020
Posted in website

7 Simple Steps to Create a Website for Your Small Business



a man standing in front of a window: A web designer working on code in an office.


© Getty Images
A web designer working on code in an office.

Online shopping is a major industry, and that’s an understatement. In the U.S. alone, we’re projected to have 300 million online shoppers by 2023. That’s more than 90% of the entire U.S. population. For any brick-and-mortar store or business, having an online store — or at least an online presence — is essential.

The convenience, speed, and accessibility of the Internet make it appealing to consumers, who use it for product purchases and product research. Your small business site will help you attract and retain customers, generating more profit.

Best of all, building a website no longer requires extensive knowledge of website development, web design, or even coding. You only need to follow a few simple steps.

• Choose a website builder

• Select your domain name

• Decide on a theme or template

• Add plug-ins

• Create pages and content

• Test your site and publish

• Market and maintain your website

Things to consider before beginning to make your website

Building a website is a fairly simple process, but it’s important to start with a solid plan in mind. Consider your purpose, brand identity, and budget before beginning.

1. What is the main purpose of your website?

Like any business endeavor, your website needs a clear purpose. Will your site simply provide information about your company, or will you sell products? The process of creating a website varies slightly depending on your main purpose.

Whatever the purpose of your website, it’s essential to clearly state what your business does on the homepage of your site. Define your purpose, then work on drafting a direct, concise summary of your business. Customers need to immediately recognize whether you can meet their needs.

2. What is your brand

04
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Create a Custom Business Website With This Easy-to-Use Builder

Wire-framing is simplified with Blueprints Website Builder.

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2 min read

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These days, every business needs a web presence. But not everyone is so technical. For designers, that’s great. They can earn a pretty penny by building websites for entrepreneurs on a freelance basis. However, that’s expensive for entrepreneurs. Something has to give. Blueprints Website Builder by Bootstraptor solves problems for both entrepreneurs in need of a website and graphic designers who need an expedited workflow.

This seamless prototyping tool allows you to put together websites at warp speed, regardless of your coding expertise. With more than 500 ready-made blocks, 200 prototype starter templates, and 30 navigation panels, you can burn through wire-framing a website in absolutely no time. If you don’t know any code, you can easily just drag-and-drop elements to build your website. If you do know code, you can easily add elements and improve website usability within the interface.

Every page is SEO-oriented and optimized using more than 96 Google PageSpeed Insights, plus they’re automatically adapted to any device. Once you’re done setting up your prototype, you can easily export an HTML file on native Bootstrap 4 code to get it ready for integration into your existing web platform. As such, setting up a brand new website can be done in as little as five minutes. Whether you’re a web design pro looking to speed up your workflow or a novice who just wants to have a functional business website, Blueprints Website Builder has

29
Sep
2020
Posted in internet

How Internet-connected voter check-in devices can create election chaos

A polling-place worker holds an "I'm a Georgia Voter" sticker during the primary election on June 9, 2020 in Atlanta.
Enlarge / A polling-place worker holds an “I’m a Georgia Voter” sticker during the primary election on June 9, 2020 in Atlanta.

A federal judge in Georgia has ordered election officials to print paper backups of voter data so that voting can proceed even if the digital system for checking in voters fails. This is a win for plaintiffs who have argued that flaws in Georgia’s electronic-poll-book (EPB) system hampered voting in the June primary and could do so again in November.

Over the last 20 years, a lot of discussion has revolved around the risk that electronic voting machines pose to the security and integrity of elections. But there has been less attention paid to electronic poll books—another digital system that can undermine election integrity if they malfunction.

Pollworkers use EPBs to verify a voter’s eligibility and then check the voter in. Malfunctions in these systems can slow down the voting process so much that some people give up voting altogether. By targeting precincts where most people vote for a particular candidate or party, a hacker could potentially swing a close election just by triggering malfunctions in electronic poll books. And while voting machines are supposed to be kept off the Internet, electronic poll books are often online throughout election day.

There’s no evidence that anyone has deliberately exploited this potential vulnerability in American elections, and maybe no one ever will. But at a minimum, electronic poll books make American elections more complex and brittle. It’s possible that, as with voting machines, the old paper system was actually a better choice.

Georgia’s electronic poll books caused problems

Georgia has long been a battleground in the debate over electronic voting technology. Until last year, Georgia used ancient paperless voting machines that didn’t allow for a meaningful post-election audit. Last year,