Tag: copy

12
Oct
2020
Posted in website

6 Signs You Need to Update Your Website Copy

Copy is the unsung hero of websites.

All too often, text gets pushed by the wayside in favor of flashy images and fancy design trends.

When push comes to shove, a website with no copy is little more than a jumble of pictures and a color scheme.

Moreover, subpar copy will devalue a website – no matter how nice the design features are.

The realization that it’s time to update your web copy doesn’t always feel like a kick in the rear.

While not getting leads or having insanely high bounce rates are a couple of the glaring signs, many indicators don’t meet the eye.

In this post, you’ll discover six signs that it’s time to take a step back and re-examine your website copy.

1. Keyword Trends Are Making Your Web Copy Obsolete

Monitoring keyword trends and updating content should be common practice for any SEO professional.

But for those who haven’t updated their copy in a few years, there’s a good chance that some of the keywords you had originally included are no longer driving the interest they used to.

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Think about it this way:

The keywords “penguin update” or “penguin update recovery” were goldmines to SEO agencies back in 2012.

But the heyday of those terms is long gone – and having them in your website copy obviously isn’t attracting the same interest.

6 Signs You Need to Update Your Website Copy

A current example would be related to Adobe BC.

As you’ve probably read, Adobe is shutting down Business Catalyst in March 2021.

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That said, if you specialize in building sites hosted on BC – or are offering BC migrations services, any copy you have around these keywords will soon be old news.

Keyword trends are constantly changing, and your web copy needs to be based around

11
Oct
2020
Posted in website

Ask These 4 Questions to Design a Great SaaS Website Copy

SaaS websites need to be special.

There’s always a temptation to focus heavily on what your software does: the technology used in your processes, the features of your offering, etc. Those things are great – and they can serve as validation of your offering’s value.

But it’s important to put your own preconceptions aside when you’re designing your SaaS website. If you don’t intentionally work to view your website from an objective perspective, your site will almost certainly have too much jargon, be too complicated to navigate, or even miss your target demographic entirely.

With that in mind, here are four questions to ask when designing and building a website for your SaaS company. These questions will give you the perspective you need in order to find out if your website design is optimal.

1. Does your SaaS website make a great first impression?

Here’s a fact that keeps web designer up at night: from the first click a user makes onto your site, you have between 50 milliseconds and 6 seconds to create a positive first impression. Clearly, that’s not a ton of time. How are you going to impress that visitor in such a short time span?

Here’s how:

And here are three examples I like:

bambooHR

Why I like it: it’s simple and it captures the core of the product. The image conveys the brand’s purpose and ethos, and the clear CTAs are focused on a free trial (which tends to be a good hook for SaaS products).

SpringSled

Why I like it: wow, this is simple. It gets the message across so clearly and quickly, and aligns really well with the theme of the product, which is (no surprise) simplicity.

WISTIA

Why I like it: the tagline is really simple, and the messaging is really consistent

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

House antitrust report: Amazon uses seller data to copy products

  • Amazon uses third-party seller data to copy the site’s most popular products, an antitrust report by the House Judiciary Committee alleged on Wednesday.
  • Former Amazon sellers told an antitrust subcommittee the company released new products almost identical to their own and “killed” their sales.
  • Amazon has denied accusations of this behavior in the past.
  • “We have a policy against using seller-specific data to aid our private-label business,” Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos said in July.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee said it has uncovered evidence that Amazon uses detailed data from third-party sellers to copy popular products and push some sellers out of business — something the tech giant has consistently denied. 

The subcommittee said it had heard “repeated” concerns from both former employees and third-party sellers that Amazon uses seller data to either copy products or source the product directly from the manufacturer. It then sells it direct to consumers, according to the subcommittee’s findings.

“We have heard so many heartbreaking stories of small businesses who sunk significant time and resources into building a business and selling on Amazon, only to have Amazon poach their best-selling items and drive them out of business,” the subcommittee’s chairman David Cicilline said.

The findings formed part of a wide-ranging antitrust report on Big Tech companies, including Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook.

One former Amazon employee who spoke to the committee compared access to third-party seller data to a “candy shop.”

“Everyone can have access to anything they want,” they said. Employees even use this data to set up their own successful third-party accounts, the Democratic leaders of the committee wrote in their report on Wednesday. 

Similar accusations have mounted over the past 15 months, but Amazon has adamantly denied using third-party seller data in this way.