Tag: contract

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

SAIC Wins $49.5 Million U.S. Navy contract for Royal Saudi Naval Forces (RSNF) C4ISR Upgrades and Refurbishment

Company will leverage solutions such as engineering, design, and integration solutions to support critical network upgrades and refurbishment of Royal Saudi Naval Forces’ systems

The U.S. Navy awarded Science Applications International Corp. (NYSE: SAIC) a $49.5 million single-award task order to continue to provide the Royal Saudi Naval Forces support services for command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) upgrade and refurbishment. Work will take place in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Under the cost-plus fixed-fee task order, awarded as part of the SeaPort-NxG contract, SAIC will leverage repeatable solutions such as engineering, design and integration, integrated product support and sustainment capabilities on critical networks. These networks fulfill the Naval Information Warfare Systems Command’s requirement for Program Executive Office C4I International Integration Program Office (PMW 740) Royal Saudi Naval Forces (RSNF) In-Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) Support Services.

“For more than 40 years, SAIC has supported the Navy’s mission to help maintain the Royal Saudi Naval Forces’ C4ISR capability modernization, engineering and logistics,” said Jim Scanlon, SAIC executive vice president and general manager of the Defense Systems Group. “As a leader in technology integration, SAIC is excited to continue its assistance to the Navy as it continues to build this strategic partnership with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.”

SAIC will deliver solutions and services to include program management, systems engineering and integration, maintenance engineering, and integrated logistics for the modernization and refurbishment of RSNF systems. These services are enabled by SAIC’s legacy of support to RSNF, and SAIC’s investments in digital engineering and end-to-end logistics and supply chain solutions.

The prime contract has a five-year base period of performance.

About SAIC

SAIC® is a premier Fortune 500® technology integrator driving our nation’s digital transformation. Our robust portfolio of offerings across the defense, space, civilian, and intelligence markets

07
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

Small company fears bankruptcy after losing internet contract to Bell Aliant



a close up of a bicycle: Acadian Communications was a bidder in the second round for qualified suppliers, but lost to Bell Aliant. 


© John Robertson/CBC
Acadian Communications was a bidder in the second round for qualified suppliers, but lost to Bell Aliant. 

A small Nova Scotia-based company is upset about losing a provincial government contract to deliver high-speed internet, saying the loss could force it out of business.

Acadian Communications of Chéticamp lost to Bell Aliant in the second round of bidding for qualified suppliers to provide high-speed internet service.

It missed the first round of bidding due to a change in company ownership. Bell Aliant was among the successful bidders in that round and is working on providing service in the Chéticamp area.

Andrew LeBlanc, owner of Acadian Communications, said his company is already preparing to lose customers. 

“As Bell comes in and steals away customers, there’s a point in the not too far future where I think we could go under,” he said.

Acadian Communications provides internet for around 800 customers and employs four people, including LeBlanc. He said if business drops to just 200 or 300 customers, the company won’t be profitable anymore. 

Smaller companies losing out

LeBlanc said they offered a lower bid and asked for a 40 per cent subsidy from the province, while Bell Aliant asked for a 50 per cent subsidy.

“They’re going to cover the maximum amount of houses which is great for themselves and great for Nova Scotia residents, but for myself and several other companies across the province it’s not good at all,” said LeBlanc.

The second round of bidding went entirely to Bell Aliant. The company will provide high-speed internet for another 32,000 homes and businesses. The provincial government is providing $59 million for the project.

“In effect, the provincial government is funding the biggest telecommunication company to bankrupt our company,” said LeBlanc. “Something with that just doesn’t sit right.”

Develop

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

New York and New Jersey launch COVID-19 contract tracing apps

New York and New Jersey joined a handful of other states in launching contact tracing apps for COVID-19.



a woman holding a cell phone: People with masks walking while looking at their phones.


© Provided by Live Science
People with masks walking while looking at their phones.

On Thursday (Oct. 1), the two states each launched their own contact tracing apps called “COVID Alert NY” and “COVID Alert NJ,” respectively. These apps, which keep users’ identities anonymous, are based on a new technology developed by Google and Apple. They use bluetooth to connect to nearby phones and alert users if they’ve been in close contact with someone who has been infected with the coronavirus. 

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From the very start of the pandemic, contact tracing has been an important part of helping to stop the spread of the virus. Contact tracing involves identifying people with COVID-19, figuring out who they came in close contact with, and notifying all of those people so that they can self-quarantine or get tested before spreading the virus to others. Most of those efforts have been conducted by people conducting phone calls.

Related: Coronavirus live updates

“We have about 15,000 people statewide who do contact tracing. They call them disease detectives,” New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a briefing on Thursday. “But we’ve been looking for a technology-based solution.”

The contact tracing app “knows where your cellphone is, the app will know where a person who tested positive was through their cellphone and the app can tell you if you were within 6 feet of that person,” Cuomo said. “It doesn’t give names, it doesn’t give any privacy information [and] it’s voluntary.”

This is how it works: When you’ve spent more than 10 minutes within 6 feet of another person with the app, which is “long enough and close enough for you to catch the virus,” your phone exchanges

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Intel wins second phase of contract to help Pentagon develop chips

By Stephen Nellis

(Reuters) – Intel Corp on Friday said that it has won a second-phase contract in a project aimed at helping the U.S. military make more advanced semiconductors within the United States.

Under the project, Intel will help the military develop prototypes of chips using its semiconductor packaging technology at factories in Arizona and Oregon. The packaging technology allows pieces of chips called “chiplets” from different providers to be combined into one package, helping cram more features into a smaller finished product while lowering its power consumption.

Intel declined to disclose a dollar figure for its portion of the contract, which is being overseen by the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division. Intel won part of the first phase of the contract in 2019.

Intel’s work with the Defense Department comes as U.S. officials focus on boosting domestic semiconductor manufacturing in response to the rise of China as a strategic competitor. About 75% of the world’s chipmaking capacity is in Asia, with many of the most advanced plants in Taiwan and Korea, within the reach of the Chinese and North Korean militaries.

“I think one of the areas where we can have the most impact on China broadly is re-shoring microelectronics,” Ellen Lord, the Pentagon’s chief weapons buyer, told the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee in a hearing on Thursday.

Intel is one of three companies in the world that can make highly advanced computer chips. The other two – Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co Ltd and Samsung Electronics Co Ltd – have packaging technology similar to Intel’s.

But Intel has been working on the technology longer and can perform the work in the United States, which the other two cannot, said Dan Hutcheson, chief executive officer of VLSI Research.

“There’s no one else with the mix of technology