Tag: contest

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Farming assistant app Agrolly wins IBM’s Call for Code contest

The innovative platform will be a one-stop-shop for farmers seeking out more information on what to plant and when.

figuremhfhacombine.jpg

An autonomous combine–again, smaller and lighter than conventional farm machinery–harvesting HFHa’s first crop in September 2017.

Image: HandsFree Hectare

Agrolly, a platform built to help farmers in emerging markets, was chosen as the winner of IBM’s 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge.

Agrolly provides farmers with a bevy of information about weather patterns and crop characteristics, giving them advice on what would be the best thing to plant during certain times of the year. The platform also has ways for farmers to connect with experts as well as ways for them to share information and tools with each other.

During the virtual “2020 Call for Code Awards: A Global Celebration of Tech for Good” event, Agrolly was announced as the winner of the annual competition, which brings together the world’s brightest minds to create solutions to pertinent problems. This year’s task was to develop solutions to problems related to climate change and COVID-19.

“Climate change is making it worse for farmers in developing countries and they are losing yield production because of the changes. When you come to emerging markets and you look at these farmers, they don’t have the resources, they don’t know what to plant, they don’t know what the weather will be, and they don’t have advantages,” said Manoela Morais, CEO of Agrolly.

SEE: Big data’s role in COVID-19 (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

“We want to change the farming industry in the long run by listening to these small farmers in emerging markets, giving them a voice, and empowering them with the latest tech available. We wanted to create an ecosystem where they can contact each other, solve their problems and build a system that is better in the

07
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

The Contest to Protect Almost Everything on the Internet

Cryptographers are in the business of being paranoid, but their fears over quantum computers might be justified. Within the next 10 to 15 years, a quantum computer could solve some problems many millions of times faster than a classical computer and, one day, crack many of the defenses used to secure the internet.

“The worst-case scenario is quite bad,” says

Chris Peikert

, associate professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Michigan, who has been studying cryptography for two decades.

That is why Dr. Peikert and hundreds of the world’s top cryptographers are involved in a competition to develop new encryption standards for the U.S., which would guard against both classical and quantum-computing cyberattacks.

This summer, federal officials announced the 15 algorithms that will be considered for standardization, meaning the winners would become a part of the architecture of the internet, protecting people’s sensitive data.

Next, researchers will spend about a year trying to break them to see which ones hold up, and test them to get the best balance of performance and security.

Quantum

computers are still in the early stages of development. The machines harness the properties of quantum physics, including superposition and entanglement, to radically speed up complex calculations related to finance, health care and manufacturing that are intractable for today’s computers. These machines are being built by startups and technology companies such as International Business Machines Corp. and

Alphabet Inc.’s

Google. They are still several years away from being fully commercialized.

While traditional computers store information as either zeros or ones, quantum computers use quantum bits, or qubits, which represent and store information as both zeros and ones simultaneously.

Some researchers