Tag: companies

14
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Software Companies Still Need To Address Legacy Systems

CEO of Rookout. Has led data-driven businesses, products and R&D teams over the last two decades, from startups to government organizations.

Cloud. Microservices. Containers. Serverless.

These are buzzwords everyone in the software industry has become familiar with. That’s not even getting into the world of “machine learning” and “AIOps” (artificial intelligence operations). While it’s true that many cutting-edge companies, particularly in the tech industry, are embracing and adopting modern software architectures and methodologies, the fact is that the large majority of companies are running legacy applications responsible for millions, if not billions, of dollars in revenue.

The pandemic has shown just how much we rely on these aging legacy IT systems. According to a recent report from AppDynamics, 66% of IT professionals say that “the pandemic has exposed weaknesses in their digital strategy, driving an urgent need to push through initiatives which were once a part of multiyear digital transformation programs.” While we can hope this time will be a forcing function for many businesses to reflect and modernize, history shows that change is hard and that if things return to normal, so will old processes. 

Governments, banks, airlines — nearly every major industry is dealing with old IT, hardware and legacy code that makes moving fast impossible, resolving issues difficult and troubleshooting applications expensive. These old systems are more prone to have bugs, cause outages, and waste software engineering time.

One of the major reasons many of these organizations are slow to modernize is that they don’t want to jeopardize the stability of their core applications. If you ask their engineers, many of them wish they could snap their fingers and make them cloud-native, but the fact is that migrating to new technologies is cumbersome and often messy. While legacy code is a pain, it’s often responsible

14
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Three Ways Software Development Companies Drive Digital Acceleration

As VP of Operations at BairesDev, Damián is responsible for the entire customer relations life-cycle, safeguarding the company’s operations.  

The concept of digital acceleration (clearly a child of digital transformation) has grown exponentially in the past couple of weeks. Nothing unexpected, considering the huge demand for technology solutions that the novel coronavirus pandemic generated on a worldwide scale. Nonetheless, as most businesses moved digital transformation to the top of their to-do list, many have stumbled upon the harsh reality of technology adoption: It takes crucial know-how to do it right. 

Working with software development companies has become one clear long-term solution for this dilemma. The industry knowledge, expertise and technology capabilities they bring to the table often just can’t be matched by in-house operations. And, what’s more, outsourcing IT services has proven to be a faster and more cost-effective way of developing high-quality products, even in industries as complex as healthcare. 

So, can software development companies be the answer to your digital acceleration process? Let’s answer that question by taking a look at three roles they play in this framework. 

1. Technology Discovery And Adoption

Digital transformation is a lot more than moving legacy processes into the digital realm. It requires a detailed analysis of the needs, context and opportunities of an organization and its people. Only then can you hope for some form of digital transformation. With acceleration in the mix, things are a little different. 

When time is of the essence, software development companies play a crucial role in technology discovery and adoption. Simply put, they show up knowing what’s working in the market right now and, based on your information, are able to determine whether that would work for you, too. 

In my experience, this happens a lot with artificial intelligence, cloud computing and data

12
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

It’s been 24 years since Internet companies were declared off-the-hook for the behavior of their users. That may change, and soon.

(Cross posted from Signal360)

In a sweeping talk at the Association of National Advertisers conference last month, P&G Chief Brand Officer (and ANA Chair) Marc Pritchard laid out a five-step plan to address systemic problems in the marketing and media industries. Each step addresses serious challenges and opportunities — in diversity, inequality, and creative and business practices. But perhaps no step is more challenging — and crucial — than Pritchard’s Step Four: Eliminating all harmful content online. 

“There is still too much harmful, hateful, denigrating, and discriminatory content and commentary in too many digital sites, channels, and feeds,” Pritchard said. “There is no place for this type of content.”

While nearly everyone agrees with the idea of eliminating harmful content, key actors across the digital media industry seem paralyzed when it comes to how best to take action on the problem. What’s really going on? To understand, we must dive into the early formation of the Internet industry in the United States, and the role the First Amendment plays — to this day — in shaping an increasingly contentious debate on how to regulate digital speech. 

But, First, a Bit of History

When the Internet was in its early stages as a commercial medium more than 25 years ago, a moral panic erupted in the United States following the publication of a Time magazine cover story Titled “Cyberporn” and featuring a terrified child staring aghast into the blue light of a computer monitor, the story claimed — falsely, as it turned out — that the majority of images on the then-novel medium consisted of pornography. 

Internet service providers were to be treated like the phone company … not held responsible for the speech of their customers.

Congress quickly took up the cause of cleaning up the Internet and passed the 

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

U.S. companies lobby against China tech bans

The friction shows the difficulties the government faces in translating its national-security agenda into the real world, where influential industries have developed deep ties to China over many years.

Congress and the Trump administration say the measures are necessary to lessen U.S. reliance on a strategic rival that could sabotage, hack or withhold important technology. Some U.S. companies argue that the restrictions will cost tens of billions of dollars and in some cases won’t improve national security.

“We are broadly supportive of the spirit” of a law imposing new restrictions for federal contractors, Wesley Hallman, head of strategy and policy at the National Defense Industrial Association, said in an interview, adding that “some suspicion of Chinese components” is warranted.

But “if you were to apply this law very broadly in the way it is written,” he said, “just about all contractors doing work with the federal government, they would have to stop.”

China hawks in Congress have raised alarms about the corporate pushback, accusing companies of putting profits before national security.

“Tech insiders are trying to gut provisions of the defense funding bill that would restrict use of Chinese tech products. Senate negotiators, don’t give in! This is not the time to go soft on #China,” Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) tweeted Oct. 1.

“Under no circumstances should we weaken or delay implementation of our laws banning the U.S. federal government and government contractors from using Huawei equipment,” Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) tweeted this summer, a position his office said he maintains. “That would be a gift to the Chinese Communist Party.”

The new restrictions have been proposed or enacted in a mix of bills, laws and executive-branch actions affecting a range of industries.

Prohibitions adopted with bipartisan support in an annual defense-spending law are drawing particular industry ire.

As

11
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Tech Dominates FlexJob’s Top 50 Companies Hiring For Remote Jobs

  • 24 of the top 50 companies who posted the most remote job openings on FlexJobs between March 1 and September 15, 2020, are software and technology-based.
  • Atlassian, Amazon, Collabera, CrowdStrike, Oracle, Red Hat, Tanium and Twilio are a few of the many tech companies actively looking to fill remote-based job positions today.  
  • Amazon has 949 open work-from-home positions open today on their Amazon Jobs site, 287 of which are for Solution Architect roles, 99 in Software Development and 83 in Project/Program/Product Management Non-Tech.   

FlexJobs is one of the leading sites and subscription services specializing in verified high quality, remote and flexible jobs. They have seen an increase of more than 50% in remote job listings in the areas of Computer/IT, Customer Service, Accounting & Finance, Project Management, Marketing and Sales this year. Tech companies’ need for remote workers is the most pervasive, with 24 of the 50 actively looking to fill open positions. Healthcare is the next-highest industry, with seven of the 50 companies looking to bring remote-based hires onboard.  

The recruitment site is also seeing an increase in the number of new companies recruiting remote workers. The site reports they’ve seen a 10% increase in Q2 over Q1 and a 53% increase in new companies in Q3 over Q2. They recently completed an analysis of the top 50 companies who have posted the most remote job openings between March 1 and September 15, 2020. You can find the analysis here: Top 50 Companies Hiring for Remote Jobs During the Pandemic.

The following are the tech companies who have posted the most remote job openings on the FlexJobs site this year:

  • Atlassian – Currently has 124 open remote