Tag: Code

13
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Farming assistant app Agrolly wins IBM’s Call for Code contest

The innovative platform will be a one-stop-shop for farmers seeking out more information on what to plant and when.

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An autonomous combine–again, smaller and lighter than conventional farm machinery–harvesting HFHa’s first crop in September 2017.

Image: HandsFree Hectare

Agrolly, a platform built to help farmers in emerging markets, was chosen as the winner of IBM’s 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge.

Agrolly provides farmers with a bevy of information about weather patterns and crop characteristics, giving them advice on what would be the best thing to plant during certain times of the year. The platform also has ways for farmers to connect with experts as well as ways for them to share information and tools with each other.

During the virtual “2020 Call for Code Awards: A Global Celebration of Tech for Good” event, Agrolly was announced as the winner of the annual competition, which brings together the world’s brightest minds to create solutions to pertinent problems. This year’s task was to develop solutions to problems related to climate change and COVID-19.

“Climate change is making it worse for farmers in developing countries and they are losing yield production because of the changes. When you come to emerging markets and you look at these farmers, they don’t have the resources, they don’t know what to plant, they don’t know what the weather will be, and they don’t have advantages,” said Manoela Morais, CEO of Agrolly.

SEE: Big data’s role in COVID-19 (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

“We want to change the farming industry in the long run by listening to these small farmers in emerging markets, giving them a voice, and empowering them with the latest tech available. We wanted to create an ecosystem where they can contact each other, solve their problems and build a system that is better in the

11
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Huawei’s Four Open Source Basic Software Projects Infuse Diversified Computing Power into Every Line of Code

Four Basic Software Projects Power Innovation of Open Source Communities

While hardware provides the foundation of computing power, basic software helps unleash the potential, and application software creates tangible value for end users. Innovation will gain speeds when a virtuous cycle is formed among hardware vendors, basic software vendors, application software vendors, system developers, software developers, and users.

Open source software is an important part of Huawei’s computing ecosystem strategy. Huawei values open hardware, open source software, and partner enablement. By leading open source initiatives, contributing, and enabling business partners, Huawei supports the technical software ecosystem with continuous innovation.

In terms of community contributions, Huawei ranks No. 2 globally in the latest Linux Kernel 5.8 release. Huawei leads four open source projects: openEuler, openGauss, openLooKeng, and MindSpore, and has completed continuous integration with more than 40 mainstream communities. By contributing to upstream communities for mainstream scenarios, Huawei enables 80% of key communities to provide native support for Kunpeng. In this way, ARM developers can use these open source components easily. Such efforts all help to lay a solid groundwork for full-stack hardware and software collaboration.

Hardware is the basis of the entire ecosystem, and operating systems are the basis of software. openEuler officially went open source on December 31, 2019, and the 20.03 Long-Term Support (LTS) version was released in March 2020. After nine months of operation, the openEuler community has attracted more than 2000 contributors, set up 70 special interest groups (SIGs), and engaged more than 60 leading enterprises in China. Six top operating system vendors in China have joined the community and released commercial versions.

The innovation version, openEuler 20.09, will also be officially released on September 30, 2020. The release features 1+8: one kernel plus eight innovation projects, covering multi-core acceleration, iSula2.0 lightweight

07
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Copyright, computer code debated in Google-Oracle court clash

US Supreme Court justices peppered lawyers for Google and Oracle with questions on computer code and copyright Wednesday in a court clash which could have major ramifications for the technology sector and digital innovation.

Oral arguments were heard in a decade-old legal battle between the two Silicon Valley giants stemming from Oracle’s claim that Google illegally copied parts of the Java programming language to develop its Android mobile operating system.

The case revolves around whether copyright protection should be extended to application software interfaces (APIs), or bit of code that allow programs and apps to work together, and if so, whether Google’s implementation was a “fair use” of copyrighted material.

In the court session held remotely, Google attorney Thomas Goldstein argued that the practice of reusing software interfaces “is critical to modern interoperable computer software” and allows developers “to write millions of creative applications that are used by more than a billion people.”

Goldstein maintained that these APIs were simply a set of instructions for software and were “minimally creative,” thus not eligible for copyright.

He claimed that Oracle’s effort would “make computer programming incredibly inefficient,” resulting in “fewer creative computer programs.”

Joshua Rosenkranz, the attorney arguing for Oracle, said the cases was simply about the theft of 11,000 lines of computer code, which should be under copyright protection as a “creative” work.

Rosenkranz said Google could have paid Oracle a licensing fee or developed its own code as rivals did.

“Microsoft and Apple both spent billion of dollars creating their competing platforms, and that’s exactly what the Copyright Act requires,” he told the eight justices.

– Like restaurant menus? –

Chief Justice John Roberts questioned whether the APIs should be considered like restaurant menus which simply organize offerings based on categories.

“You’re going to have… appetizers first and entrees

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Bitcoin’s 12.3M-digit code turned into surreal paintings

Written by Oscar Holland, CNN

Bitcoin may be completely paperless, but one artist has meticulously dragged it into the physical world by hand-painting the cryptocurrency’s 12.3 million-digit founding code across 40 separate paintings.

Working under the project name Robert Alice, artist Ben Gentilli spent three years working on the canvases, which he has collectively titled “Portraits of a Mind.”

Using specialist machinery, he engraved each painting with over 300,000 digits of the complex code underpinning the virtual currency. Each digit was then hand-painted, producing what its creator calls a “digital fingerprint carved out of paint.”

“The core idea of the project was, ‘How do you make something of real cultural value within the Bitcoin sphere?'” Gentilli said via video call. “And for me, the thing I kept coming back to was this code base, because it’s really the very basis of Bitcoin culture.”

The decision to split the work across 40 different canvases was partly inspired by the decentralized nature of Bitcoin, which is issued and traded without the oversight of central banks or financial authorities. In early 2020, Gentilli sold the first 20 paintings privately to collectors from the art and technology worlds.

Each canvas contains over 300,000 digits of the code.

Each canvas contains over 300,000 digits of the code. Credit: Robert Alice

Those artworks are now located in countries around the world, from Switzerland to Saudi Arabia, according to a project press release.

Among the first batch of collectors was Jehan Chu, the co-founder of a blockchain venture capital investment firm, who said that the cryptocurrency’s early pioneers are “a fiercely proud and self-identifying tribe” that “until now, have lacked the cultural objects and icons to signify their tribe.”

“As an early Bitcoiner, this is the first object I am proud to hang on my wall to signal my history in the Bitcoin revolution,” he is

01
Oct
2020
Posted in programming

Learn to code in 2020’s top programming languages with this $39 training

The Hill may be compensated and/or receive an affiliate commission if you buy through our links.

The job market may have taken a sharp right turn in the past few months, but even amidst all the changes happening in the workforce, one thing remains constant: Coding is a lucrative and in-demand skill. 

Programmers can command hefty six-figure salaries some even as starting salaries and the demand for these roles has increased quite dramatically in the past year, with growth for positions such as blockchain engineers and security engineers rising over 100%. The moral of the story here is that even if you have yet to touch a line of code, now is as good of a time as any to bust into the industry. 

As a starting point, we’d recommend taking the classes in The 2020 Premium Learn To Code Certification Bundle. Not only is this go-at-your-own-pace coding bootcamp affordable (right now its on sale for $39), but it also comes chock-full of over 120 hours of training content on today’s most essential computer programming languages, including JavaScript, Ruby, HTML, and Python, as well as foundational training on concepts such as machine learning and data science.

The education takes an interactive approach to learning, giving students practice interfaces and projects to build alongside their lectures. This includes crafting websites, games, and mobile apps that can then be highlighted in a portfolio for upcoming job interviews. And, along the way, digital lecturers break down complex topics and processes into easy-to-follow, step-by-step guides.

As one current student notes, “These courses are awesome! They’re detail rich and have plenty of hands on projects to keep you focused.” Lifetime access to the training materials means that if you need a refresher throughout the course or your career or want to progress