Tag: cloud

13
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Keysight Technologies Enhances PathWave Software Suite with Cloud Processing to Eliminate Design Workflow Limitations

Enables engineers to focus on improved designs and device reliability while reducing project risk

Keysight Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: KEYS), a leading technology company that helps enterprises, service providers and governments accelerate innovation to connect and secure the world, announced it has expanded the company’s PathWave Software Suite with new and enhanced capabilities. The new PathWave solutions enable engineers to remove computational limitations across the workflow, with cloud processing clusters, to improve designs and device reliability, while reducing project risk.

Design and test engineers are struggling with complexity limitations that require weeks, if not months, of crunching data which can significantly slow the development process and market introduction. Keysight’s PathWave, an open, scalable, and predictive software platform, offers fast and efficient data processing, sharing and analysis at every stage in the product development workflow. Combining design software, instrument control and application-specific test software, it enables engineers to address increasing design, test, and measurement complexity and develop optimal electronic products.

“Keysight continues to invest in software solutions through new capabilities in our PathWave platform,” said Jay Alexander, chief technology officer at Keysight Technologies. “We are confident these new capabilities will enable our customers to bring computational power into their own design and test workflows – accelerating time to results, time to insights, and ultimately time to market.”

Further strengthening the capabilities of PathWave, Keysight is launching 5 new and enhanced software solutions that leverage the power of cloud processing to address computational limitations throughout the design process, including:

PathWave Advanced Design System (ADS) Software 2021

Now equipped with design cloud simulation services, PathWave ADS 2021 software reduces simulation time, increases simulation test coverage and provides access to scalable hardware resources in the cloud. This new software solution eliminates barriers to developing high performance hardware products by enabling design engineers for mobile and

12
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Personal Growth Needs To Be Every Cloud Software CEO’s Top Priority, Says Bill.com’s Rene Lacerte.

On this episode Of Scaling Up, March Capital managing partner, Jamie Montgomery and Forbes futurist Rich Karlgaard talk to Bill.com’s founder and CEO, René Lacerte. Bill.com is a fast-growing cloud software company that sells automated payment services for small and medium sized businesses. When we interviewed Lacerte, BILL was worth $8 billion in market cap; today it is $9.12 billion. We talked about fast growth leadership, mentorship secrets, and how Lacerte’s father was a pianist for the late Gram Parsons, even though Lacerte’s father was missing four fingers.

Click below for video.

MORE FROM FORBESPersonal Growth Needs To Be Every CEO’s Top Priority, Says Bill.com’s Rene Lacerte

The following transcript has been edited for clarity and length.

Rich Karlgaard:  René, what was your original mission, how was it progressed, and the fundamental question – why is what you do important to your customers?

René Lacerte:  We think of ourselves as champions for small and medium-sized businesses to help them automate the financial processes that around paying and getting paid. If you think about payables and receivables, people do not expect this number to be true but it is. Ninety percent of businesses still rely on paper to manage their processes and make their payments. If paper is a primary form of making the payment, it ends up being fairly inefficient, error-prone, and lots of challenges. It ends up being a mess. For us, I wanted to focus on solving that mess. I wanted to take care of that pain point and really make a difference for a small and mid-sized businesses. There are six million employers in the U.S. – that is the target market. We have 98,000 businesses today that are on our platform. They use us to interact with two and a half million network members

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

France’s Health Data Hub to move to European cloud infrastructure to avoid EU-US data transfers

France’s data regulator CNIL has issued some recommendations for French services that handle health data, as Mediapart first reported. Those services should avoid using American cloud hosting companies altogether, such as Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud.

Those recommandations follow a landmark ruling by Europe’s top court in July. The ruling, dubbed Schrems II, struck down the EU-US Data Privacy Shield. Under the Privacy Shield, companies could outsource data processing from the EU to the US in bulk. Due to concerns over US surveillance laws, that mechanism is no longer allowed.

The CNIL is going one step further by saying that services and companies that handle health data should also avoid doing business with American companies — it’s not just about processing European data in Europe. Once again, this is all about avoiding falling under U.S. regulation and rulings.

The regulator sent those recommendations to one of France’s top courts (Conseil d’État). SantéNathon, a group of organizations and unions, originally notified the CNIL over concerns about France’s Health Data Hub.

France is currently building a platform to store health data at the national level. The idea is to build a hub that makes it easier to study rare diseases and use artificial intelligence to improve diagnoses. It is supposed to aggregate data from different sources and make it possible to share some data with public and private institutions for those specific cases.

The technical choices have been controversial as the French government originally chose to partner with Microsoft and its cloud platform Microsoft Azure.

Microsoft, like many other companies, relies on Standard Contractual Clauses for EU-US data transfers. But the Court of Justice of the EU has made it clear that EU regulators have to intervene if data is being transferred to an unsafe country when

08
Oct
2020
Posted in software

COVID’s Impact On Cloud Software Stocks

This is an update to the article “Playing Defense with Cloud Software Stocks” published on May 27th, 2020

Rebound numbers from Q3 will look spectacular following the paralyzing effects of strict shelter-in-place orders in Q2. The economy is officially in a recession after posting two negative quarters of GDP growth at (5%) in Q1 and (32%) GDP in Q2. The latest estimate from Atlanta’s Fed GDPNow for Q3 2020 is showing a record rebound of 35.3%.

This represents an increase of 7.9% quarter-over-quarter and 3.1% below the pre-recession high. For comparison purposes, the Financial Crisis of 2008 bottomed at 4.0% below its pre-recession during the third and fourth quarters of its recession.

The chart above shows the projected Q3 rebound of 35.3% from the Atlanta Fed’s GDP Now released on October 6th, 2020.

Cloud and IT Budgets: Staying Objective

Some will argue the market is not the economy (which is true), however, cloud software can’t stop the spiraling effects of lower IT/cloud spending and tighter budgets that follow a weaker economy. One area that companies might reduce costs is to trim down on the number of cloud software and tools they use. Unemployment could exacerbate this if the subscriptions are paid per employee.

Spiceworks recently released a survey that shows 80% of IT-decision makers expect IT budgets to grow or stay steady over the next 12 months. This supports the notion that even during periods of uncertainty, IT and cloud are central and critical to operations.

With that said, the decision-makers polled stated the primary drivers in IT budgets are noted to decrease year-over-year except covid-related budget allocations. In the past, drivers such as employee growth, security concerns, and the

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

IBM to Break up 109-Year Old Company to Focus on Cloud Growth | Technology News

(Reuters) – International Business Machines Corp

is splitting itself into two public companies, capping a years-long effort by the world’s first big computing firm to diversify away from its legacy businesses to focus on high-margin cloud computing.

IBM will list its IT infrastructure services unit, which provides technical support for 4,600 clients in 115 countries and has a backlog of $60 billion, as a separate company with a new name by the end of 2021.

The new company will have 90,000 employees and its leadership structure will be decided in a few months, Chief Financial Officer James Kavanaugh told Reuters.

IBM, which currently has more than 352,000 workers, said it expects to record nearly $5 billion in expenses related to the separation and operational changes.

Investors cheered the surprise move by Chief Executive Officer Arvind Krishna, the key architect behind IBM’s $34 billion acquisition of cloud company Red Hat last year, sending the company’s shares up 7%.

“We divested networking back in the ’90s, we divested PCs back in the 2000s, we divested semiconductors about five years ago because all of them didn’t necessarily play into the integrated value proposition,” Krishna said on a call with analysts.

In a blog, Krishna called the move a “significant shift” in the 109-year-old company’s business model.

“IBM is essentially getting rid of a shrinking, low-margin operation given the cannibalizing impact of automation and cloud, masking stronger growth for the rest of the operation,” Wedbush Securities analyst Moshe Katri said.

IBM, which has sought to make up for slowing software sales and seasonal demand for its mainframe servers, said it would now focus on open hybrid cloud and AI solutions that will account for more than half of its recurring revenues.

Krishna, who replaced Ginni Rometty as CEO in April, said IBM’s software and