Tag: classes

07
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Get the Most Out of the World’s Most Popular Spreadsheet Software With These Master Classes

Get 70 hours of Excel training for just $50.

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Microsoft Excel is the world’s most popular spreadsheet software. It’s so popular now, some kids start learning it in elementary school because it’s so critical to the modern workforce. Of course, we can’t go back to fifth grade to suggest Excel be part of the curriculum, but we can take matters into our own hands. The Ultimate Excel Bootcamp Bundle can get things on the right path.

This four-course bundle includes more than 70 hours of training in Microsoft Excel. If you thought you knew some Excel, think again. This massive bundle is designed to take you from an Excel novice to a pro who is able to use the powerful software’s most advanced features to simplify just about everything in your workflow.

During these courses, you’ll learn how to use Excel to manage large amounts of data, automate spreadsheets, master graphing for presentations, and much more. Through practical, hands-on training, you’ll learn how to turn data into sound business decisions, explore financial modeling theory, understand how to clearly present your analysis to others, and help lead your business to smarter, more data-driven decisions. There’s a course dedicated entirely to PivotTables, one of Excel’s most powerful features that allows you to extract significance from large, detailed data sets. Finally, you’ll delve into VBA and macros, Excel’s automation tools that allow you to add interactivity to your spreadsheets to update data in real-time as you

07
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

Gov’t to study move to allow poor students go to computer shops for online classes

Guillermo Eleazar

Lt. Gen. Guillermo Eleazar. (Photo from his Facebook account)

MANILA, Philippines — The government will discuss a proposal to allow poor students avail the services of computer and internet shops for their online classes, the Joint Task Force (JTF) COVID Shield revealed on Wednesday.

In a statement, JTF COVID Shield chief Police Lt. Gen. Guillermo Eleazar said the task force issued the proposal as most of the local government units (LGUs) are lacking funds to procure gadgets and provide them to thousands of students for distance learning.

“We feel and understand the concerns of both the students and the parents, especially the poor, in this new kind of learning method. That is why the national government, through the NTF (National Task Force) on COVID-19 and the IATF (Inter-Agency Task Force on Emerging Infectious Diseases) are really finding ways to extend all the necessary assistance to them,” Elezar, who is also Philippine National Police chief for administration, said.

Currently, Eleazar said the existing guideline prohibits minors from entering establishments such as computer and internet shops to prevent further transmission of the coronavirus disease.

Several groups have complained about the conduct of blended learning as public schools marked the start of academic year 2020-2021 on Oct. 5, Monday.

Youth group Samahan ng Progresibong Kabataan said education of Filipino students was underfunded and exclusive. Alliance of Concerned Teachers (ACT), meanwhile, received reports that some modules given to students have missing pages and errors.

JPV


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06
Oct
2020
Posted in programming

BRIC Chief Kristina Newman-Scott looks to offer free classes, TV programming during pandemic

By 2015 she was the director of culture and historic preservation for the whole state. In the role, she pushed back against a view of art as an uneconomical sector, instead finding ways it could support both artists and the economy.

It’s hard to think of an institution whose purpose and specialties would be a better fit for Newman-Scott than BRIC. One of the foremost arts organizations in the city, its focus spans the visual and performing arts, modern media and education. The leading presenter of free programming in the borough, BRIC is expressly focused on increasing public access to the arts.

It’s a mission that easily could’ve been challenged by the pandemic. Many of BRIC’s peers are facing existential questions. Institutions from the Met to the Brooklyn Museum have had to lay off workers. But BRIC hasn’t, Newman-Scott said.

“We unfortunately have become, as members of the creative economy, accustomed to being the first hit and hardest hit,” she said. “When there are budget cuts, you often see arts on the front line.”

Drawing on her previous work in government, Newman-Scott has partnered with the city Department of Education to ensure BRIC provides educational TV programming. The center also has offered free classes to various constituencies. Small-business leaders, for example, can learn the basics of digital media design.

Newman-Scott also led the first-ever remote BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn Festival. The virtual version of the event, typically held in Prospect Park, radically expanded its footprint, reaching 2.5 million people in more than 40 countries.

“All of those things are part of our day to day, but in this moment, it is important for our community to truly see us as a resource for them,” she said.

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04
Oct
2020
Posted in programming

Opinion | In 50 years of PBS programming, content for Americans of all classes and political views

Polling shows the resilience of the reputation PBS has built over the past five decades. Some 68 percent of respondents told YouGov between August 2019 and August 2020 that they have a positive opinion of PBS, making the service more popular than awards-dominating HBO and putting it on the heels of streaming giant Netflix. A Pew Research Center study on polarization and the American media published in January found that PBS is one of just three outlets — from among 30 choices — trusted by Americans of both parties more than they distrust it.

Paula Kerger, the president and chief executive of PBS, says that trust starts close to home. Even if viewers are skeptical of the media writ large, she argues, they trust journalists who are a part of their own community.

Small rural stations are helped by shared branding and programming, while the service’s urban behemoths benefit from the member stations’ insights and roots.

PBS also does more than take kids to the Land of Make Believe and their parents to English country houses. “American Portrait,” for instance, uses audience submissions to power on-air programming and events. This structure relies on two core assumptions: that the lives of ordinary Americans are newsworthy; and that people are interesting to each other, and not simply as objects of partisan contempt or scorn.

Some of PBS’s most popular programming also speaks to fundamental questions that can get steamrolled on more frenetic news networks, or marginalized by channels eager to make “prestige TV” and profits.

In a time of “patriotic education” programs and falling monuments, PBS attempts to navigate a more personal approach to what Kerger calls “a hunger for us to understand where we came from.” The long-running hit “Antiques Roadshow” is about more than the excitement of potentially striking