Tag: Boom

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Apple’s Mac sees strong growth amid coronavirus-fueled PC market boom

Apple’s Mac segment grew nearly 39% year-over-year in the third quarter of 2020 amid double-digit growth across the broader PC market.

As consumers and businesses switch to remote education and work during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, research firm IDC estimates that global PC shipments grew 14.6% in Q3 2020 and reached 81.3 million units shipped.

The research firm also estimates that Apple shipped 6.89 million macOS devices during the quarter, up from 4.59 million units in the year-ago quarter. That represents year-over-year growth of 38.9%, IDC’s estimates show.

“Consumer demand and institutional demand approached record levels in some cases,” IDC Research Manager Jitesh

Ubrani said. “Had the market not been hampered by component shortages, notebook shipments would have soared even higher during the third quarter as market appetite was yet unsatiated.”

Apple’s market share also grew slightly during the same period. In Q3 2020, Apple had an 8.5% share of the market, up from 7% in Q3 2019. Apple ranks as the fourth largest PC maker, behind Lenovo, HP and Dell but ahead of Acer.

IDC estimates that Lenovo shipped 19.2 million units in Q3 2020; HP shipped 18.6 million units; Dell shipped 11.9 million units; and Acer, in fifth place, shipped 6 million units.

Growth was similar across most markets in region, with strong single-digit growth in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Europe. In Latin America, the traditional PC market posted double-digit growth for the first time in five years.

In the U.S., the traditional PC market saw an “extraordinary quarter posing strong double-digit shipment growth” fueled by stay-at-home orders and inventory replenishment. But while notebooks saw their shipments strengthened, the desktop market declined slightly year-over-year.

Throughout the quarter, IDC suggests that shortages of critical components led to a backlog of orders and a “missed opportunity” for many

08
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Amid a boom in SPACs, few women investors

If you’ve been following the SPAC boom, you may have noticed something about these blank-check vehicles that are springing up left and right in order to take public privately held companies. They are being organized mostly by men.

It’s not surprising, given the relative dearth of women in senior financial positions in banking and the venture industry. But it also begs the question of whether women, already hustling to overcome a wealth gap, could be left behind if the trend gains momentum.

Consider that studies have shown women investors are are twice as likely to invest in startups with at least one female founder, and more than three times as likely to invest in startups with female CEOs. It’s not a huge leap to imagine that women-led SPACs might also be more inclined to identify women-led companies with which to merge and take public.

More, the SPAC sponsors themselves are reaping financial rewards. In return for sponsoring a SPAC in its pre-IPO stage, sponsors typically receive 25% of the SPACs founder shares, which can mean a lot of money in a short amount of time, given that SPACs typically aim to merge with a target company in two years or less. In fact, even if the SPAC performs terribly — say the company with which it merges is later accused of fraud — those sponsors get paid.

Eventbrite cofounder Kevin Hartz, who is overseeing a $200 million SPAC, explained it to us in August this way: “On a $200 million SPAC, there’s a $50 million ‘promote’ that is earned.” But “if that company doesn’t perform and, say, drops in half over a year or 18-month period, then the shares are still worth $25 million. (Hartz himself called this guaranteed payout “egregious,” though he and his partner in the SPAC, Troy

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Boom Supersonic wants you to break the sound barrier

boom-xb-1.png

Someday ordinary people might fly at supersonic speeds in this. 


Boom Supersonic

Boom Supersonic on Wednesday unveiled what it hopes to be the first step in letting ordinary people fly at supersonic speeds again. The XB-1 that rolled out at an event in Colorado won’t carry passengers, but it’ll serve as a demonstration aircraft to test the company’s technologies.

“We have begun to pave the path of a mainstream supersonic future,” said CEO Blake Scholl. “Today we stand on the precipice of a new age of travel.” 

The 71-foot XB-1 will use three General Electric engines with 12,000 pounds of thrust. As with the Concorde, a long pointy nose will obscure the view of the runway from the cockpit during landing, but cameras will take the place of the Concorde’s dropping nose.

“[The XB-1’s] fuselage is designed for speed minimizing drag and supersonic performance,” Scholl said. “Its carbon composite airframe retains its rigidity and strength even under the temperatures of supersonic flight and its delta wind balances low-speed performance for take off and landing with high speed efficiency.”

Boom’s ultimate goal is to bring back commercial supersonic flight following the retirement of the Anglo-French Concorde in 2003. Its planned Overture airliner, which was first announced at the 2017 Paris Air Show, promises to carry between 45-55 passengers –half the capacity of the Concorde.

Flying at more than twice the speed of sound, it would cut the current flight time between London and New York in half to just 3 hours, 15 minutes and a reduce a typical 14-hour flight between Los Angeles and Sydney to 6 hours, 45 minutes. 

More importantly, though, Boom promises the Overture will