Tag: Book

06
Oct
2020
Posted in programming

Copyright Clearance Center Announces Virtual Programming for Frankfurt Book Fair 2020

As a Premium Partner of the Book Fair, CCC Continues to Spotlight Innovation in Global Publishing

Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC), a leader in advancing copyright, accelerating knowledge, and powering innovation, has once again partnered with The Frankfurt Book Fair to spotlight innovation in global publishing.

“As the Frankfurt Book Fair is virtual this year, we are adapting our programming to resonate with audiences worldwide, celebrating the innovative solutions being developed by the publishing industry,” said Michael Healy, Executive Director, International Relations, CCC. “We look forward to engaging in valuable discussions on key issues and fully supporting the Book Fair’s 2020 motto – Signals of Hope: New Perspectives for a Stronger Future.”

As part of its partnership with the Book Fair, CCC will host interactive panel discussions and presentations by industry experts, including:

COVID-19, Copyright and the Creative Economy
Tuesday, 13 October, 11:00am – 11:30am, EDT, 17:00 CEST

The global pandemic has dramatically accelerated the shift to digital media across the globe. In the virtual environment where distance is now immaterial, humanity has both converged and been scattered. The essential work of publishing – sharing knowledge and enabling expressions – has never been more important.

  • Bodour Al Qasimi, Vice President, International Publisher Association; Founder and CEO, Kalimat Publishing Group

  • Tracey Armstrong, President and CEO, CCC

  • Fathima Dada, Managing Director of Oxford Education, OUP

  • Michael Healy, Executive Director, International Relations, CCC

Where Publishing and the Pandemic Meet
Thursday, 15 October, 11:00am – 12:00pm EDT; 17:00 – 18:00 CEST

When CCC invited senior policy makers, scholarly and society publishers, funders, institutions and researchers to meet in London last year, participants explored how best to advance scholarly research and improve the scientific publishing ecosystem. And while market disruptions, expected and unexpected, are always a factor in scientific publishing, the COVID-19 pandemic quickly became

04
Oct
2020
Posted in programming

Dubai-based Indian Student Uses stay-at-home Time to Write Book on Computer Programming

Dubai: A Dubai-based Indian student used his stay-at-home time due to the Covid-19 pandemic to write a book on computer programming, a media report said.

The Khaleej Times report published on Saturday said that the 12-year-old Amritesh Banerjee, the class 8 student of Cambridge International School, Dubai, is not only a published writer, but is also coaching students virtually.

“It took me four months to complete this book. The paperback version was launched in September. The online version will be launched on October 15, which is the World Students’ Day,” said Amritesh.

“My father got 5,000 likes on his LinkedIn profile after he posted my book. That’s when people started approaching him, saying their children, who are my age, needed guidance on the subject.

“So I’ve held a few online classes as peer-to-peer learning can prove to be immensely helpful in understanding concepts. My father has always reiterated … that learning is about sharing,” the Khaleej Times report quoted the student as saying.

Amritesh, who loves all things mathematics, has already learnt multiple computer programming languages, developed video games and also customised an AI chatbot.

“My Grade 7 IT teacher in the school really inspired me to take up this project. My father further guided me. Gradually, I started getting interested in it and got so absorbed that I could not stop. I ended up writing 5,000 words, which turned into a book.

“So, this book provides all the real-world solutions to those who are venturing into the world of Python programming. Therefore, this book is for beginners. Soon, I intend to undertake a project for advanced levels, too,” he said.

Source Article

04
Oct
2020
Posted in programming

Dubai-based Indian student writes book on computer programming : The Tribune India

Dubai, October 4

A Dubai-based Indian student used his stay-at-home time due to the Covid-19 pandemic to write a book on computer programming, a media report said.

The Khaleej Times report published said that the 12-year-old Amritesh Banerjee, a Class VIII student of Cambridge International School, Dubai, is not only a published writer, but is also coaching students virtually.

“It took me four months to complete this book. The paperback version was launched in September. The online version will be launched on October 15, which is the World Students’ Day,” said Amritesh.

“My father got 5,000 likes on his LinkedIn profile after he posted my book. That’s when people started approaching him, saying their children, who are my age, needed guidance on the subject.

“So I’ve held a few online classes as peer-to-peer learning can prove to be immensely helpful in understanding concepts. My father has always reiterated … that learning is about sharing,” the Khaleej Times report quoted the student as saying.

Amritesh, who loves all things mathematics, has already learnt multiple computer programming languages, developed video games and also customised an AI chatbot.

“My Class VII IT teacher in the school really inspired me to take up this project. My father further guided me. Gradually, I started getting interested in it and got so absorbed that I could not stop. I ended up writing 5,000 words, which turned into a book.

“So, this book provides all the real-world solutions to those who are venturing into the world of Python programming. Therefore, this book is for beginners. Soon, I intend to undertake a project for advanced levels, too,” he said. IANS

Source Article

03
Oct
2020
Posted in programming

Dubai teen uses #StayHome time to write book on computer programming – News

Today, the Indian boy is not only a published writer, but is also coaching students virtually.

Most students his age spent time playing video games as UAE residents stayed home due to movement restrictions imposed to stymie the spread of Covid-19 in April. But 12-year-old Amritesh Banerjee donned the hat of an author to pen a textbook for school children. The Grade 8 student of Cambridge International School, Dubai, took upon himself the mantle of writing a book on Python programming.

“It took me four months to complete this book. The paperback version was launched in September. The online version will be launched on October 15, which is the World Students’ Day,” said Amritesh.

Today, the Indian boy is not only a published writer, but is also coaching students virtually. “My father got 5,000 likes on his LinkedIn profile after he posted my book. That’s when people started approaching him, saying their children, who are my age, needed guidance on the subject. So I’ve held a few online classes as peer-to-peer learning can prove to be immensely helpful in understanding concepts. My father has always reiterated … that learning is about sharing.”

Amritesh spends nearly eight hours daily in front of his computer, but all for a cause. The boy, who loves all things mathematics, has already learnt multiple computer programming languages, developed video games and customised an AI chatbot.

“My Grade 7 IT teacher in the school really inspired me to take up this project. My father further guided me. Gradually, I started getting interested in it and got so absorbed that I could not stop. I ended up writing 5,000 words, which turned into a book. So, this book provides all the real-world solutions to those who are venturing into the world of Python programming. Therefore,

30
Sep
2020
Posted in programming

Boston Book Festival hosts scavenger hunt, story walks during October programming

In addition to its string of livestreamed events, the 2020 Boston Book Festival is hosting several outdoor activities in October for in-person visitors.

The festival’s annual Book Hunt Oct. 1 and 2 offers the chance to search for free books, authored by festival presenters, hidden around Boston and other towns. Follow the organization on Twitter and Instagram (@bostonbookfest) for clues to the hidden treasures’ whereabouts. This year, the festival has involved a wider range of towns in its adventure. That means bibliophiles can also follow these institutions for clues: Walden Woods Project (@TheWaldenWoods), Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House (@LouisaMayAlcott), the Emily Dickinson Museum (@DickinsonMuseum); the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art (@carlemuseum); Herman Melville’s Arrowhead (@Arrowhead1850), Edith Wharton’s The Mount (@TheMountLenox), and the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center in Connecticut (@HBStoweCenter).

Via the festival’s Story Walks project, families can pick up a map at Frugal Bookstore in Roxbury to see which of the neighborhood’s stores have displayed pages of Kwame Alexander’s Caldecott Medal-winning children’s book, “The Undefeated.” Or they can go to Downtown Crossing to peruse the pages of Oge Mora’s “Saturday,” displayed in storefronts. Additional activities, including a giveaway from J.P. Licks, will be stationed along each route. Both walks will be up and running for the length of the festival. Maps will also be available at bostonbookfest.org/story-walks/.

While in Downtown Crossing, stop by the window at 27 School St. to read 10 memorable submissions to the festival’s At Home Community Writing project. Each mini essay captures a slice of life, however ordinary, during the pandemic from local residents.

Learn more at www.bostonbookfest.org.

Diti Kohli can be reached at [email protected]. Follow her on Twitter at @ditikohli_.