Tag: Body

14
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

The Internet Clapped Back at a Troll Who Body Shamed Billie Eilish

Getty Images, Toni Anne Barson / Contributor

After a paparazzi image of Billie Eilish made its way to the internet over the weekend, the thing that Eilish anticipated would happen happened—she was criticized for her body. But, of all the things we’re willing to put up with in the year 2020, criticizing an 18 year old for her appearance is simply not one of them, and the internet is shutting down body-shaming trolls left, right, and center.

In a 2019 ELLE Magazine feature, Eilish, who was then just 17, noted that she wears oversized clothing to keep the critics at bay. “I have to wear a big shirt for you not to feel uncomfortable about my boobs,” she said. “I was born with fucking boobs, bro,” and if she wears anything remotely form-fitting, social media instantly reminds her of that, and not in a nice way.

So, when Eilish stepped out during the pandemic wearing a tank top and shorts, it’s sadly unsurprising that she immediately garnered attention.

However, before the troll army could come out in full force, the internet stepped in to stand up for Eilish.

The tweet in question have gotten over 5,000 likes, but the supportive “are you serious?” responses racked up tens of thousands.

“Calling out” or joking about Eilish showing more skin than usual is honestly just odd. Body shaming doesn’t do anything but perpetuate toxic beauty standards and damage a person’s self confidence and concept of self worth—and for what?

We’re tired of it. And thankfully, we’re in the majority.

07
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

5 Upper Body Stretches That’ll Help You Unwind After a Stressful Day on the Computer

Maybe working from the couch and hunching over your laptop is to blame, perhaps it’s the shoulder tenseness that comes along with a packed Zoom calendar and multiple looming deadlines, or it could be something else entirely. Either way, work-from-home upper-body stiffness and tightness is real – and uncomfortable.

Thankfully, your yoga practice can help you out here. According to Andrea Russell, a yoga instructor at Sky Ting in New York City, yoga can help with work-from-home tension “because it addresses the body on all levels.”

“The breathing and slower pace can address stress and anxiety (which we’re all feeling a lot these days!) while the movements relieve the physical tightness in the body,” Russell explains.

“A lot of times we focus heavily on the movements or specific shapes, but yoga is holistic, so it’s important to pay attention to the breath as you move into the postures. It’s a really simple but powerful practice that grounds you in the present moment and helps to relax the mind.”

After you log off for the day, connect to your breath and stretch with this five-pose sequence curated by Russell. “I actually WFH all day and these are the shapes I use when I’m feeling tight in my shoulders and neck,” she says. “You can do them at any time, but they’re also nice at the end of the day because they help to undo all the hunching and rounding in your spine! Personally, I love doing these movements whenever I feel like I’m stressed or tight.”

As an added bonus, moves one through four can actually be done seated, and Russell says you can even use the sequence as a warmup for a more vigorous yoga workout. While working through the pose directions, remember to take all the time you need

06
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

10-Minute Yoga Sequence For Upper Body Tightness

Maybe working from the couch and hunching over your laptop is to blame, perhaps it’s the shoulder tenseness that comes along with a packed Zoom calendar and multiple looming deadlines, or it could be something else entirely. Either way, work-from-home upper-body stiffness and tightness is real — and uncomfortable.

Thankfully, your yoga practice can help you out here. According to Andrea Russell, a yoga instructor at Sky Ting in New York City, yoga can help with work-from-home tension “because it addresses the body on all levels.”

“The breathing and slower pace can address stress and anxiety (which we’re all feeling a lot these days!) while the movements relieve the physical tightness in the body,” Russell explains.

“A lot of times we focus heavily on the movements or specific shapes, but yoga is holistic, so it’s important to pay attention to the breath as you move into the postures. It’s a really simple but powerful practice that grounds you in the present moment and helps to relax the mind.”

After you log off for the day, connect to your breath and stretch with this five-pose sequence curated by Russell. “I actually WFH all day and these are the shapes I use when I’m feeling tight in my shoulders and neck,” she says. “You can do them at any time, but they’re also nice at the end of the day because they help to undo all the hunching and rounding in your spine! Personally, I love doing these movements whenever I feel like I’m stressed or tight.”

As an added bonus, moves one through four can actually be done seated, and Russell says you can even use the sequence as a warmup for a more vigorous yoga workout. While working through the pose directions, remember to take all the time you need

06
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

AI Can’t Flourish Without a Physical Body

Know Thyself

If we ever want to develop the kind of advanced, thoughtful AI shown in science fiction, it might need a human-like body.

Aberystwyth University computer scientist Mark Lee argues that a truly advanced AI system that can learn from and interact with its environment must have a robotic body as well. Lee wrote in The Conversation that otherwise, even the best AI couldn’t develop the sense of self that gives us humans a subjective viewpoint and helps us infer things about the world.

Growing Up

Lee cites recent attempts to teach AI algorithms in a way that mirrors how infants learn about the world, by slowly learning the rules through experimentation while taking in and interpreting their surroundings. This way, he argues, AI-driving robots may someday become empathetic enough that we could develop a relationship with them.

“So while disembodied AI definitely has a fundamental limitation,” Lee wrote in The Conversation, “future research with robot bodies may one day help create lasting, empathetic, social interactions between AI and humans.”

Self-Centered

Lee’s human-centric ideas aren’t universally accepted within computer science, though.

Modeling AI hardware and software after the human brain has certainly led to some major advances. But other experts argue that focusing explicitly on recreating the human mind in a machine could hold the field back.

READ MORE: Why AI can’t ever reach its full potential without a physical body [The Conversation]

More on AI: Artificial Consciousness: How To Give A Robot A Soul

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