Tag: block

12
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Block political texts and ads on your phone. Here’s how

Election Day is 22 days away and political ads are bombarding your Facebook feed, mailbox and now your text message inbox. Unfortunately, there isn’t a Do Not Text registry that applies to texting the same way it does to phone calls. There is, however, still a way you can attempt to stop political ads from swarming your phone.



a hand holding a cellphone: Stop unwanted text messages on your phone. Óscar Gutiérrez/CNET


© Provided by CNET
Stop unwanted text messages on your phone. Óscar Gutiérrez/CNET



a close up of a computer keyboard: Don't click on links in spam messages, and do some research before replying stop.


© Angela Lang/CNET

Don’t click on links in spam messages, and do some research before replying stop.


If you’re wondering how the organization got your number in the first place, it’s because all states allow access to voter data for election purposes — so if you’re a registered voter, your information is on file. 

Here’s how to stop the unwanted political texts.

What political campaigns know about you

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Reply STOP to the sender

Usually when you receive a political text message, you can opt-out. You may see a message in the text body like “reply STOP or unsubscribe to stop receiving messages.” Before responding, however, make sure it’s a legitimate campaign number and not a scammer. If you reply to a scam message, it lets the sender know your number is active.

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You may have to text STOP multiple times if several political campaign people are reaching out to you from different numbers.

Filter out the text messages

Your smartphone has capabilities that let you filter out text messages from unknown senders. While this doesn’t stop unknown senders from texting you, it will hide the messages so you don’t have to see them. Here’s how to filter out the messages on iPhones and Android phones .

If you’re an iPhone user, open the Settings app and tap Messages.

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Steve and Alex From Minecraft Block Off Some Time to Join the Cast of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

The Minecraft Mainstays Are the Second DLC Fighters Added to Fighters Pass Vol. 2

On Oct. 13, worldwide phenomenon Minecraft is sending two of its finest rectangular heroes to join the ever-expanding cast of playable fighters in the Super Smash Bros. Ultimate game for the Nintendo Switch system. Steve and Alex, who both proudly sport more right angles than a high school geometry class, will be the seventh DLC fighters added to the game. They are part of the second Challenger Pack in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Fighters Pass Vol. 2, which also includes a new stage and seven music tracks from the Minecraft series.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201003005002/en/

In a video hosted by Masahiro Sakurai, the Super Smash Bros. creator detailed the boxy new fighters, providing a detailed breakdown of their one-of-a-kind move set, which involves digging into stages to gather materials to craft tools and construct blocks to use in a variety of ways in battle. (Photo: Business Wire)

In a video hosted by Masahiro Sakurai, the Super Smash Bros. creator detailed the boxy new fighters, providing a detailed breakdown of their one-of-a-kind move set, which involves digging into stages to gather materials to craft tools and construct blocks to use in a variety of ways in battle.

To view the video in its entirety, visit https://www.youtube.com/c/nintendo/videos.

“Steve and Alex bring their world of building and crafting from Minecraft to the action-packed stages of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate,” said Nick Chavez, Nintendo of America’s Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing. “When new fighters are added through the Fighters Pass, they bring a whole new style of gameplay to Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, offering players new strategies and options to keep the experience fresh.”

When selecting this new

02
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

U.S. government appeals judge’s ruling to block WeChat app store ban

By David Shepardson

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department on Friday said it was appealing a judge’s decision to block the government from barring Apple Inc <AAPL.O> and Alphabet Inc’s <GOOGL.O> Google from offering Chinese-owned messaging app WeChat for download in U.S. app stores.

The government said it was appealing the Sept. 19 preliminary junction issued by U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The injunction blocked the U.S. Commerce Department order, which would also bar other U.S. transactions with Tencent Holding’s <0700.HK> WeChat, potentially making the app unusable in the United States.

A U.S. spokesman for Tencent did not immediately comment.

The Justice Department said earlier that Beeler’s order was in error and “permits the continued, unfettered use of WeChat, a mobile application that the Executive Branch has determined constitutes a threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States.”

Lawyers for the U.S. WeChat Users Alliance, the group behind the legal challenge to the WeChat ban, said on Friday the department “has still presented no compelling national security interest to justify such an unprecedented ban” and will oppose the effort.

The group noted Tencent tried to negotiate a settlement with the Commerce Department and offered a number of mitigation measures to address data security concerns.

Beeler said WeChat users “have shown serious questions going to the merits of the First Amendment claim.” The U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment guarantees freedom of speech.

WeChat has had an average of 19 million daily active users in the United States, analytics firms Apptopia said in early August. It is popular among Chinese students, Americans living in China and some Americans who have personal or business relationships in China.

WeChat is an all-in-one mobile app that combines services similar to Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram

01
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Section 230 will be on the chopping block at the next big tech hearing

It looks like we’re in for another big tech CEO hearing.

The Senate Commerce Committee voted Thursday to move forward with subpoenas for Twitter’s Jack Dorsey, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Sundar Pichai, the CEO of Alphabet. The unusual decision to subpoena the social media chief executives adds yet another politically volatile event to the schedule in the run-up to the most contentious election in modern U.S. history.

The hearing will focus on Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, the key law that shields online platforms from legal liability for the content their users create.

While the topic might sound dry for the unacquainted, the law is an explosive topic, both politically and in the eyes of the tech industry, which could be left reeling from even what might seem like minor changes to the legal shield.

Committee Chairman Roger Wicker called the decision to hold the hearing “imperative” in order for Americans to “receive a full accounting from the heads of these companies about their content moderation practices.”

Remarkably, the decision to subpoena the CEOs was unanimous, with ranking Democrat Maria Cantwell joining the vote to subpoena the companies after initially opposing the decision.

Cantwell previously called the idea of issuing subpoenas an “extraordinary” step intended to “chill the efforts” of companies to remove misinformation and harassment from their platforms.

Republican members of the Senate Commerce Committee include its Wicker, Ted Cruz, John Thune and Rick Scott. Democrats on the committee include Cantwell, Amy Klobuchar, Brian Schatz, and Kyrsten Sinema.

What’s going on with Section 230?

Section 230 is generally regarded as the legal infrastructure that made the social internet possible, from Facebook accounts and comments sections to Yelp and Amazon reviews. It’s a short law but in 2020 an increasingly controversial one as lawmakers scramble for levers to