Tag: barrier

07
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Boom Supersonic wants you to break the sound barrier

boom-xb-1.png

Someday ordinary people might fly at supersonic speeds in this. 


Boom Supersonic

Boom Supersonic on Wednesday unveiled what it hopes to be the first step in letting ordinary people fly at supersonic speeds again. The XB-1 that rolled out at an event in Colorado won’t carry passengers, but it’ll serve as a demonstration aircraft to test the company’s technologies.

“We have begun to pave the path of a mainstream supersonic future,” said CEO Blake Scholl. “Today we stand on the precipice of a new age of travel.” 

The 71-foot XB-1 will use three General Electric engines with 12,000 pounds of thrust. As with the Concorde, a long pointy nose will obscure the view of the runway from the cockpit during landing, but cameras will take the place of the Concorde’s dropping nose.

“[The XB-1’s] fuselage is designed for speed minimizing drag and supersonic performance,” Scholl said. “Its carbon composite airframe retains its rigidity and strength even under the temperatures of supersonic flight and its delta wind balances low-speed performance for take off and landing with high speed efficiency.”

Boom’s ultimate goal is to bring back commercial supersonic flight following the retirement of the Anglo-French Concorde in 2003. Its planned Overture airliner, which was first announced at the 2017 Paris Air Show, promises to carry between 45-55 passengers –half the capacity of the Concorde.

Flying at more than twice the speed of sound, it would cut the current flight time between London and New York in half to just 3 hours, 15 minutes and a reduce a typical 14-hour flight between Los Angeles and Sydney to 6 hours, 45 minutes. 

More importantly, though, Boom promises the Overture will

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Flood barrier successfully protects Venice from high tide

VENICE, Italy (Reuters) – A long-delayed flood barrier system successfully protected Venice from a high tide for the first time on Saturday, bringing big relief to the lagoon city after years of repeated inundations.



a large ship in a body of water: Mose flood barrier scheme is used for the first time, in Venice


© Reuters/MANUEL SILVESTRI
Mose flood barrier scheme is used for the first time, in Venice



a large ship in a body of water: Mose flood barrier scheme is used for the first time, in Venicece


© Reuters/MANUEL SILVESTRI
Mose flood barrier scheme is used for the first time, in Venicece

“Today, everything is dry,” mayor Luigi Brugnaro said on Twitter. “Pride and joy.”

The network of 78 bright yellow barriers that guard the entrance to the delicate Venetian lagoon lifted from the sea bed as the tide, driven by strong winds and rain, started to climb.

City officials had forecast a tide of 130 cm (4.27 ft), well below the devastating the 187 cm tide that battered Venice last November, but enough to leave low-lying areas deep under water.



a ship in a body of water: Mose flood barrier scheme is used for the first time, in Venice


© Reuters/MANUEL SILVESTRI
Mose flood barrier scheme is used for the first time, in Venice

However, when the expected peak came shortly after midday, the famed St. Marks Square, one of the first places in Venice to flood, remained largely dry.

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The multi-billion-euro flood defence system, known as Mose, was due to come into service in 2011, but the project was plagued by corruption, cost overruns and prolonged delays.

It was finally tested in July and engineers deemed it was ready to use in bad weather.

Venice’s floods, “acqua alta” (high water) in Italian, are caused by a combination of factors exacerbated by climate change – from rising sea levels and unusually high tides to land subsidence that has caused the ground level of the city to sink.

Mose is designed to protect Venice from tides of up to 3 metres, well beyond current records, but some experts worry it will be overwhelmed by the