Tag: Bar

07
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Geotab raises the bar by enabling companies to integrate valuable telematics data into their SAP software systems

Partnership allows customers to integrate MyGeotab platform with SAP technology via free application on SAP® App Center

Geotab, a global leader in IoT and connected transportation, today announced that a new integration application specifically created for SAP software users to enable access to fleet analytics and vehicle maintenance data insights, is available on SAP® App Center, the digital marketplace for SAP partner offerings.

This partnership will allow businesses using SAP solutions, who also utilize Geotab’s fleet management offering, to gain visibility into their company’s telematics data from SAP Cloud Platform.

With this new integration application from Geotab, businesses using SAP technology can access a range of possibilities such as end-to-end digital supply chain visibility, valuable reporting on ROI, improved asset management, insights relating to vehicle health and driver safety, and more – all from within their SAP user interface. This integration with SAP Cloud Platform will also allow others outside of an organization’s fleet management team – such as the C-suite, finance and others – to better visualize how vehicle data may impact other areas of the business.

“We are pleased to be working with SAP to help take enterprise-level telematics to the next level by giving customers worldwide the opportunity to easily access and integrate their telematics data into their SAP-powered systems,” said Neil Cawse, CEO, Geotab. “As a software powerhouse, SAP has relationships with some of the world’s biggest brands across the supply chain – an ecosystem where data reigns as a key factor in maintaining and improving current operations, as well as mapping out future planning. We believe that this new partnership will help sweeten the customer experience for businesses using SAP technology by providing them with streamlined access to their telematics data insights to aid in current and future business needs.”

“As a leading

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Five bar and cafe owners arrested in France for running no-log WiFi networks

cafe bar

Image: Tony Lee

In one of the weirdest arrests of the year, at least five bar and cafe managers from the French city of Grenoble were taken into custody last week for running open WiFi networks at their establishments and not keeping logs of past connected users.

The bar and cafe owners were arrested for allegedly breaking a 14-year-old French law that dictates that all internet service providers must keep logs on all their users for at least one year.

According to local media reports [1, 2, 3], the bar and cafe owners claimed they were not aware that such a law even existed, let alone that it applied to them as they had not received notifications from their union, which usually sends alerts of industry-wide legal requirements.

Nonetheless, French media pointed out that the law’s text didn’t only apply to internet service providers (ISPs) in the broad meaning of the word — as in telecommunications providers — but also to any “persons” who provide internet access, may it be free of charge or via password-protected networks.

The bar and cafe owners were eventually released after questioning.

According to French law number 2006-64, they now risk up to one year in prison, a personal fine of up to €75,000, and a business fine of up to €375,000.

Connection logging is a feature supported on most commercial routers and has been added for this specific reason, as countries around the world began introducing data logging laws for their local ISPs.

Law enforcement agencies often rely on these logs to track down malicious behavior or details about suspects using public WiFi networks to commit crimes.

Source Article

30
Sep
2020
Posted in website

Applicants say a DC Bar website bug exposed their personal data and background checks

Lawyers applying for a license to practice law in Washington, D.C., say a security lapse by the bar association exposed their application files, including their government-issued IDs and background checks.

Applicants said the District of Columbia Bar, which oversees the admissions and licensing for lawyers practicing in the U.S. capital, was storing the applications in an unprotected directory on its website.

The DC Bar did not respond to multiple emailed requests and a voicemail requesting comment prior to publication.

The security lapse was first disclosed in an August 26 email, obtained by TechCrunch, by an unnamed whistleblower who said they “reported this issue on three separate occasions” to the DC Bar, but that their email was not returned nor was the issue fixed. The email said that documents contained personal information like names, phone numbers, and email addresses, as well as Social Security number, the applicant’s full employment history, previous home addresses, and any disciplinary records.

The whistleblower said they began notifying news outlets “in a good faith effort to notify affected users and ensure the issue is fixed.” TechCrunch obtained the email from a pseudonymous Twitter account that goes by the handle Bar Exam Tracker.

The email said that the security lapse meant that applicants could still access their uploaded application files from the DC Bar website, even after they logged out. But because the application files followed a consistent naming scheme, anyone could access the application files of other applicants by incrementally changing the web address.

“The documents are publicly accessible merely by opening their addresses in a web browser, and are not protected by any authentication system,” the whistleblower’s email wrote.

Word of the security lapse quickly spread among some bar applicants. Two applicants, who agreed to be quoted but asked not to be named for