Tag: ATT

13
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

AT&T has trouble figuring out where it offers government-funded Internet

An AT&T logo on the side of a building.

If you live in an area where AT&T has taken government funds in exchange for deploying broadband, there’s a chance you won’t be able to get the service—even if AT&T initially tells you it’s available.

AT&T’s Mississippi division has received over $283 million from the Federal Communications Commission’s Connect America Fund since 2015 and in exchange is required to extend home-Internet service to over 133,000 potential customer locations. As we previously reported, the Mississippi Public Service Commission (PSC) accused AT&T of submitting false coverage data to the FCC program. As evidence, Mississippi said its “investigation found concrete, specific examples that show AT&T Mississippi has reported location addresses… as being served when, in fact, the addresses are without service.”

AT&T has since provided an explanation that confirms it submitted false data on the serviceability of some addresses but says it will still meet the overall requirement of serving over 133,000 new customer locations. The problem is in how AT&T determines whether its wireless home-Internet service can reach individual homes and businesses. AT&T uses propagation modeling software to map out coverage areas, but the software isn’t always accurate. This wouldn’t be a problem if AT&T deployed fiber-to-the-home or fiber-to-the-node in these areas, but the company is meeting its obligations with wireless service.

“Unsuccessful installation” attempts

In some cases, customers set up appointments with AT&T to set up broadband service at addresses that AT&T had incorrectly reported to the FCC’s universal service program as being served.

“To be clear, AT&T Mississippi learned, via an unsuccessful installation attempt, that it could not offer service meeting the CAF II [Connect America Fund] minimum performance requirements at those addresses only after it had reported those addresses [to the administrator of the FCC program],” AT&T wrote last week in a letter to the FCC that was published

08
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

T-Mobile Expands Home Internet to More Than 450 Cities & Towns Left High-and-Dry by AT&T

No contract, $50 per month high-speed Internet access is rolling out to vast swaths of the country, including rural America, for both T-Mobile and non-T-Mobile customers alike

What’s the news: T-Mobile is throwing a lifeline to many communities being abandoned by AT&T. It’s expanding its $50 / month, no two-year contract Home Internet service into more than 450 cities and towns that AT&T is deserting. The Un-carrier is also opening the service to non-T-Mobile customers in these new areas.

Why it matters: Many parts of the country have extremely limited, slow Internet options and the pandemic has increased our reliance on Internet connectivity. AT&T dropping DSL service in those communities makes an already difficult situation that much worse.

Who it’s for: 20 million households in thousands of locations that are sick-and-tired of their Internet access provider jerking them around.

What AT&T takes away, T-Mobile brings back. Following news that AT&T is discontinuing DSL home broadband in many communities, T-Mobile is massively expanding its Home Internet pilot service to give another option to an additional 20 million households in parts of 450 cities and towns — many in rural America — being abandoned by AT&T in the middle of a pandemic when connectivity has never been more important. With this move, the Un-carrier is also expanding its Home Internet pilot to non-T-Mobile customers in these areas.

T-Mobile has been piloting Home Internet on its LTE network, as the Un-carrier prepares to launch 5G Home Internet across the country. And it’s clear the service is badly needed. 61 percent of rural households have no choice when it comes to high speed home broadband.

“We can’t stand idly by while AT&T leaves potentially millions with fewer home Internet options at a time when our connection to the Internet is so vital — for

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

AT&T Just Screwed Over DSL Customers and Rural America

Illustration for article titled ATT Just Screwed Over DSL Customers and Rural America

Photo: Alastair Pike/AFP (Getty Images)

As of Oct. 1, AT&T has stopped offering DSL as a new service, according to USA Today. Existing DSL subscribers, who connect to the internet via copper phone lines, will be grandfathered in. DSL is definitely old technology, but many people, especially in rural areas, still rely on it for internet access. Internet service providers have mostly focused on expanding cable broadband and fiber networks in wealthy metropolitan and suburban areas. Basically, if you don’t already have DSL service and you need to connect to the internet, you may be completely out of options.

AT&T has seen the number of DSL subscribers slowly decrease over the years. The telecom reported 653,000 total DSL connections at the end of the second quarter of 2020, compared to nearly 14.5 million fiber customers, USA Today noted. That low DSL subscriber number is not surprising considering how broadband has grown and expanded since the ‘90s, but cutting off service without providing another option leaves many customers in digital darkness.

According to a joint report from the Communications Workers of America (CWA) and the National Digital Inclusion Alliance (NDLA), AT&T has been installing just the fiber foundation in some unserved and underserved areas, but not actually installing the rest of the equipment needed to connect it to other homes outside of a specific area. About 18 million U.S. households do not have broadband of any kind, including mobile or satellite, and 14 million of those households are in urban areas—the remaining 4 million are in rural areas. Of the 53 million households in AT&T’s home internet service areas, only about 15 million of them have access to fiber.

The report notes that households with fiber internet tend to be wealthier, with a median income about 34%

05
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

AT&T kills DSL, leaves tens of millions of homes without fiber Internet

A snail resting on a computer mouse, to illustrate slow Internet service.

Getty IMages | Synergee

AT&T has deployed fiber-to-the-home Internet to less than 30 percent of the households in its 21-state territory, according to a new report that says AT&T has targeted wealthy, non-rural areas in its fiber upgrades.

The report, co-written by an AT&T workers union and an advocacy group, is timely, being issued just a few days after AT&T confirmed it will stop connecting new customers to its aging DSL network. That does not mean customers in DSL areas will get fiber, because AT&T last year said it was mostly done expanding its fiber service. AT&T said at the time that it would only expand fiber incrementally, in areas where it makes financial sense for AT&T to do so. We’ll provide more detail on the DSL cutoff later in this article—in short, the fiber/copper hybrid known as AT&T Internet is still offered to new customers, but the slower product that AT&T sells under the DSL name is being discontinued except for existing customers.

Citing data that ISPs are required to submit to the Federal Communications Commission, the report issued today said that AT&T had built fiber-to-the-home to 28 percent of the households in its footprint as of June 30, 2019. The report was written by the Communications Workers of America (CWA), a union that represents AT&T employees; and the National Digital Inclusion Alliance (NDIA), an advocacy group that has been tracking AT&T’s broadband deployments for years. The groups say that AT&T has left rural areas and people with low incomes with old, inadequate broadband services.

There are 52.97 million households in AT&T’s home-Internet service area, and 14.93 million of them have fiber-to-the-home access, the CWA told Ars. The fiber percentages were particularly bad in some states, with rates of 14 to 16 percent in Michigan, Illinois, Mississippi, and Arkansas,

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

KeyBanc Downgrades AT&T (T) to Underweight

On Sunday, Analysts at KeyBanc downgraded shares of AT&T (T) to Underweight from Sector Weight, with a Price Target of $25. The $25 price target represents downside from the stock’s current price and is based on 6.2x analysts 2021 adjusted EBITDA estimates. The analysts see a tough road ahead for the company, as the struggles continue to grow for T and the business growth has slowed. Analysts revenue and adj. EBITDA estimates are 1.5% and 5.9% lower than consensus in 3Q, respectively, due to a variety of factors, most notably in Warner Media where analysts expect the combination of return to sports and added expense associated with HBO Max to impact profitability.

The analysts point to a variety of factors expected to impact profitability, including Mobility revenue, Entertainment revenue, and the aforementioned WarnerMedia operation. New competition from cable company MVNOs and T-Mobile are expected to hurt T’s mobility segment with subscriber growth having slowed. Analysts see T as also being a share donor in the competition for 5G to the company’s detriment, which suggests wireless service revenues are unlikely to recover in the near term. COVID-19 is also impacting cellular roaming revenue and should continue to until customers return to traveling.

In the Entertainment segment, cord-cutting is pressuring subscribers, and programming costs continue to rise, both of which are pressuring profitability. While T is expecting the Entertainment segment’s margins to stabilize in 2020, analysts believe continued pressure will occur given the shift of high-margin DIRECTV customers toward low-margin AT&T TV Now and general loss of subscribers.

Anecdotally, I have friends who have not paid a penny for PPV or specialized streaming events, due to cord cutting, so the concerns are real.

WarnerMedia especially has a difficult road ahead with analysts suggesting advertising likely to be weak