Tag: allegedly

05
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Apple is suing a recycling firm for $23 million, claiming it allegedly re-sold iPhones, iPads, and Apple Watches instead of breaking them down



iPhone cases at a recycling plant in Austin, Texas. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge


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iPhone cases at a recycling plant in Austin, Texas. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge

  • Apple is suing a Canadian recycling company called GEEP which it claims resold upwards of 100,000 iPhones, iPads, and Apple Watches instead of breaking them down.
  • GEEP claims the theft of the devices was carried out by three “rogue” employees, and it wasn’t aware of it.
  • Apple is unconvinced by the defence, claiming in its suit “GEEP’s officers and directors knew or ought to have known about the scheme.”
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Apple is suing a Canadian recycling company, claiming it re-sold upwards of 100,000 iPhones, iPads, and Apple watches.

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The suit, reported by The Logic on Wednesday, was filed in January against Ontario-based recycling firm GEEP (Global Electric Electronic Processing). Apple contracted GEEP in 2014 to break down its products. 

Apple noticed the missing devices after an audit of the warehouse, which revealed devices were being taken to parts of the building not covered by CCTV. It then ran a check on the serial numbers of all the devices it sent to GEEP and found roughly 18% were still active on carrier networks.

Apple claimed in the suit it sent that more than 530,000 iPhones, 25,000 iPads, and 19,200 Apple Watches to GEEP to be broken down between 2015 and 2017. Apple notes that some, not all of its devices connect to carrier networks, so the real figure of re-sold devices is likely to be higher.

The tech giant is suing GEEP for $31 million Canadian ($23 million USD) plus any money it made from allegedly re-selling devices.

“Products sent for recycling are no longer adequate to sell to consumers and if they are rebuilt with counterfeit parts they could cause serious safety issues, including electrical or

29
Sep
2020
Posted in technology

Sonos sues Google again for allegedly copying wireless audio tech

Sonos Move
  • Sonos has sued Google again for allegedly copying wireless audio technology.
  • Nest and Chromecast devices supposedly violate five wireless audio patents.
  • It’s meant to show t he “depth and breadth of Google’s copying.”

Sonos isn’t stopping at one lawsuit against Google for allegedly copying speaker technology. The Verge reports that Sonos is suing Google again, claiming the internet giant is violating five wireless audio patents.

The suit asserts that the entire Nest and Chromecast lineups are using Sonos tech that includes phone-based streaming music control, speaker groups, and automatic EQ. Sonos felt it vital to sue again to underscore the “depth and breadth of Google’s copying,” according to legal chief Eddie Lazarus.

Google spokesperson Jose Castaneda promised that the company would fight the new lawsuit. He maintained that Google’s products had been “designed independently” and that his employer would deny the claims “vigorously.” Google countersued Sonos over the first case in June, using a common strategy to force a quick end to a legal battle.

Related: The best smart speaker you can buy

Sonos has frequently complained about the power of companies like Google and Amazon to reportedly swipe technology and dictate unforgiving terms. It went so far as to accuse them of knowingly violating patents on the assumption that the cost of any legal disputes would be trivial compared to the profits from smart speakers.

The company believes that “most people” in the wireless home audio space violate Sonos patents, Lazarus said. Suing Google was a “last resort” when discussions fail.

The lawsuit doesn’t mean Sonos has given up on Google integration. It wants a “positive relationship” with Google, according to Lazarus. However, it still wants Google to pay — we wouldn’t expect the two to warm to each other unless there’s a mutually agreeable settlement. Nest and Chromecast