Tag: Account

14
Oct
2020
Posted in computer

How to delete your Facebook account on a computer or phone, and save all your personal data in the process

  • It doesn’t take long to delete your Facebook account on either desktop or mobile.
  • Before you delete your Facebook account, you’ll have the chance to download all your photos, posts, and other data.
  • It can take up to 90 days for Facebook to fully erase all of your data, and if you try to log in within 30 days, you can choose to restore your account.
  • Visit Business Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Whatever your reason is for deleting your Facebook account, accomplishing the task is a bit easier said than done. Facebook has become so ingrained in our culture, that the prospect of deleting your account can be daunting.

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Before deleting your account, you should remember that many apps operate by logging into your Facebook account. It’s important to make sure to sever all those external connections with Facebook, so nothing crashes unexpectedly once your account is gone. Oftentimes, this will mean creating new accounts within your apps.

Last, you’ll likely want to archive all of your photos, videos, and exchanges since you won’t be able to access those once your account is gone. Luckily, Facebook will give you a chance to do this before you delete.

Once you’ve made sure you’re prepared for a life without Facebook, here’s how to delete your Facebook account using your browser or the mobile app.

How to delete your Facebook account from a desktop browser

This is likely your best option since it best allows you to combine the data download process and the actual deletion. But for those who have already downloaded their data, it’s on par with the mobile experience. Here’s how to get it done through your browser:

1. Log into your account.

2. Click the down carrot in the top-right corner and click “Settings

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Twitter said it locked Trump’s account for violating policy

  • Twitter said it locked President Donald Trump’s account after he shared the email address of a New York Post columnist on the social-media site Monday evening.
  • Trump praised a column by Miranda Devine in which she applauded the president, saying he pushed through his battle with COVID-19.
  • In a second, now deleted post, the president tweeted Devine’s email address, a move that Twitter confirmed to Business Insider violated its private-information policy.
  • Twitter said it prompted him to delete the tweet before his account could be unlocked.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Twitter said it locked President Donald Trump’s account after he shared the email address of a columnist Monday evening.

The president posted a tweet praising and quoting a column in the New York Post by the journalist Miranda Devine that ran on Sunday night. In the column, Devine praised Trump, saying he overcame his battle with the coronavirus and showed commitment to his duties as president after his diagnosis. Health experts have said he is not “out of the woods.”

Trump followed up his post with a now deleted tweet in which he tacked on Devine’s email address, prompting what she told Sky News Australia was a barrage of abuse from people online.

“People [were] just very angry, a lot of them, and they’re furious about the fact Donald Trump has actually seemingly beaten the coronavirus,” she said, according to Sky News.

Twitter confirmed to Business Insider in an email that it then locked the president’s account after it found the tweet violated its private-information policy. The policy forbids users from publishing or posting “other people’s private information without their express authorization and permission.”

According to the company’s policy, an account whose owner violates the rules will remain locked

06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Twitter locked President Trump’s account after he shared NY Post columnist’s email

Twitter said that it locked President Trump’s account on Monday after the commander-in-chief violated company policies by sharing the email address of a New York Post columnist in a chirp.

The social media giant confirmed to the Daily News on Tuesday that the coronavirus-stricken President’s account was locked until the post was removed.

Twitter’s privacy information policy states that users are not allowed to post other people’s private information without their consent.

The White House didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

A chirp from Trump’s @realDonaldTrump account posted Monday was plastered over with the message: “This Tweet is no longer available because it violated the Twitter Rules.”

In his next visible tweet, at 6:23 p.m. on Monday, Trump declared: “Will be back on the Campaign Trail soon!!! The Fake News only shows the Fake Polls.”

President Trump has continued to use his favored social media platform throughout his bout with COVID-19. His severe case of the virus landed him in Walter Reed military hospital for three nights. He returned to the White House on Monday.

Twitter also concealed a Tuesday morning post from the President that claimed the flu carries higher fatality rates than the novel coronavirus in most populations. The app said the tweet violated its misinformation rules; the post remained on Trump’s timeline behind a disclaimer.

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©2020 New York Daily News

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06
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Enormous Grindr Security Flaw Could Have Let Anyone Reset Your Password and Take Over Your Account

A serious security vulnerability in Grindr, the most popular dating app for gay, bi, trans, and queer people, has been discovered, which could have allowed anyone to infiltrate and take over a Grindr account simply by knowing the account holder’s email address.

As well as making it easy for bad actors to impersonate other people, the vulnerability would have given them easy access to potentially highly sensitive information, including the user’s HIV status, intimate pictures, dating history and sexual orientation.

In a blog post explaining how the vulnerability could be exploited, security researcher Troy Hunt described it as “one of the most basic account takeover techniques I’ve seen,” adding that “the ease of exploit is unbelievably low and the impact is obviously significant.”

He flagged the security flaw to Grindr after being tipped off by French security researcher Wassime Bouimadaghene, who had repeatedly tried to warn the company about it, only for his messages to fall on deaf ears.

Grindr has now fixed the issue, and says it doesn’t believe the vulnerability was exploited by anyone.

How the vulnerability could be exploited

Bouimadaghene had discovered it was possible to take over a Grindr account simply by entering the email address associated with the account into the Grindr password reset tool.

As well as sending a clickable link with password reset token to that email address, Grindr had been leaking the token within the browser, and Bouimadaghene worked out that he could use that to reset the password on any account, without needing to access the user’s email.

Once the password associated with an account was reset, he could easily set a new password and completely take over the account. Troy Hunt confirmed this was the case.

“We are grateful for the researcher who identified a vulnerability. The reported issue has

03
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

A shameful security flaw could have let anyone access your Grindr account

You would think a dating app that knows your sexuality and HIV status would take thorough precautions to keep that info protected, but Grindr has disappointed the world once again — this time, with a gobsmackingly egregious security vulnerability that could have let literally anyone who could guess your email address into your user account.





Luckily, French security researcher Wassime Bouimadaghene discovered the vulnerability, perhaps before it could be exploited, and it’s now been fixed.

Unluckily for Grindr, the company ignored his disclosures — until security researcher Troy Hunt (of Have I Been Pwned) and journalist Zack Whittaker (of TechCrunch) each confirmed the issue and wrote about it.

The details need to be seen to be believed (so please look at the image below) but the short version is this: if you put an email address into Grindr’s password reset form, it would send a message back to your web browser with the key you need to reset the password buried inside it.



graphical user interface, text, application


© Provided by The Verge


You could then theoretically just copy and paste that key into a password reset URL (which Hunt did), and take over an account just like that.

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Grindr COO Rick Marini told TechCrunch that “we believe we addressed the issue before it was exploited by any malicious parties,” and says Grindr will both partner with a “leading security firm” and introduce a bug bounty program. That should hopefully mean security researchers like Bouimadaghene will have an easier time getting in touch.

Grindr data is particularly sensitive

Again, this isn’t just an app that contains a few messages. Grindr users include gay, bi, trans and queer individuals, and the mere presence of the app on a person’s phone can indicate something about their sexuality they may not want revealed to the