Day: October 11, 2020

11
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

South Texas Workforce Solutions hosting annual hiring event for veterans

With Veterans Day coming up Nov. 11, Workforce Solutions for South Texas is preparing an event to assist veterans with the “Hiring Red, White & You” job fair scheduled for Nov. 5.

The event will help veterans find jobs and transition from service live into the civilian workforce. Spouses of veterans are also encouraged to participate.

“Our veterans give their all to serve our country, and we are all indebted to them for their service,” Workforce Solutions for South Texas Executive Director Rogelio G. Treviño said. “We at Workforce Solutions for South Texas are honored to be able to provide this ‘Red, White & You’ hiring event as a token or our appreciation and to help our veterans and their families obtain meaningful, good paying career jobs.”

Workforce Solutions said the ninth annual edition of the event is needed now more than ever due to the pandemic.


The event is also not the only one planned for veterans in the coming weeks as Workforce Solutions has several projects planned to help veterans get the jobs they want. They will assist throughout the hiring process including helping set up online profiles for potential employers to see.

“We have many events lined up including the work preparation classes, Veterans Appreciation Day, and headshot photo sessions at no cost for veterans who need to update their profile picture on their resume or LinkedIn account,” Workforce Solutions for South Texas Project Director Andrea De La Garza, MPA said.

Many people have lost jobs during the pandemic, and veterans have not been immune to the issue. Workforce Solutions hopes to help veterans who have lost their jobs due to the pandemic.

“We want to prepare and demonstrate our support to veterans and their families by providing quality work preparation and employment opportunities during these uncertain

11
Oct
2020
Posted in software

German tech giant Software AG hit by Clop ransomware attack

German tech giant Software AG has been hit by a ransomware attack that caused the company to suspend services.

The attack occurred Oct. 3 and has been attributed to Clop ransomware. As is typical in a ransomware attack in 2020, the company’s files were encrypted and those behind the attack demanded a ransom payment of about $20 million or they would publish internal company data.

Software AG did not pay the ransom and, according to a report on ZDNet Friday, those behind the attack have started to publish internal company information. In one screenshot, the personal details of Software AG Chief Executive Officer Sanjay Brahmawar were published, including a scan of his passport.

The company formally disclosed the ransomware attack in a statement Oct. 5, describing it as a “malware attack.” Although its current recovery status is unknown, for now the company has as its lead story on its website “important customer information.” The statement says that “due to technical issues with our online support system, we kindly ask you to send us an email with your problem description and a number for call back.” It would appear that a week later, it’s still having issues due to the ransomware attack.

Clop ransomware and the related ransomware group have been linked to previous attacks, including data being stolen from pharmaceutical industry outsourcing company ExecuPharm in April.

“Ransomware gangs are becoming bolder and more sophisticated, going after larger and more lucrative targets with their criminal attacks,” Saryu Nayyar, chief executive officer of security and risk analytics firm Gurucul Solutions Pvt Ltd A.G., told SiliconANGLE. “Even with a complete security stack and a mature security operations team, organizations can still be vulnerable. The best we can do is keep our defenses up to date, including behavioral analytics tools that can identify new

11
Oct
2020
Posted in internet

SpaceX Starlink internet service gearing up for public beta soon, says Elon Musk

After a series of delays due to unfavourable weather conditions, the latest SpaceX Starlink mission launched last week on Tuesday, Oct. 6, at 7:29 a.m. PDT. This added 60 more satellites that are intended to beam down high-speed internet from space. This brings the total number of low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites from the privately-owned space firm to almost 800. It will not end just yet, as more are planned to go up in the future. The service is expected to go online for its beta testing phase soon.



a sign lit up at night: SpaceX Starlink satellites pass over Leiden


© Photo: Marco Langbroek / Marco Langbroek
SpaceX Starlink satellites pass over Leiden

Elon Musk said, “Once these satellites reach their target position, we will be able to roll out a fairly wide public beta in northern US and hopefully southern Canada.” This is just the initial phase, as SpaceX plans to increase coverage moving forward to eventually provide a constellation that can deliver reliable broadband internet services across the globe, reports ZDNet. He added: “Other countries to follow as soon as we receive regulatory approval.”

Perhaps the most recent test of its capabilities was last month in the wake of the devastating wildfires that destroyed local communications infrastructure. Last month, the residents and emergency responders in the town of Malden in Washington were able to use Wi-Fi services provided by SpaceX Starlink satellites at the time. Musk noted that it was a special case scenario wherein it was able to help folks who needed internet connectivity given the situation.

Originally, the target speeds were set at approximately 100 megabits per second. Nevertheless, this is expected to improve as the satellite constellation grows later on. The official website states: “With performance that far surpasses that of traditional satellite internet, and a global network unbounded by ground infrastructure limitations, Starlink will deliver high-speed

11
Oct
2020
Posted in technology

Brexit Britain Is Failing EU’s Data-Privacy Test, Activist Warns

(Bloomberg) — U.K. privacy protections were criticized by an activist who told the European Union that the British shouldn’t be trusted to protect user data after Brexit.



a close up of a cage: Light trails from network switches illuminate fiber optic cables, center, and copper Ethernet cables inside a communications room at an office in London, U.K., on Monday, May 21, 2018. The Department of Culture, Media and Sport will work with the Home Office to publish a white paper later this year setting out legislation, according to a statement, which will also seek to force tech giants to reveal how they target abusive and illegal online material posted by users.


© Bloomberg
Light trails from network switches illuminate fiber optic cables, center, and copper Ethernet cables inside a communications room at an office in London, U.K., on Monday, May 21, 2018. The Department of Culture, Media and Sport will work with the Home Office to publish a white paper later this year setting out legislation, according to a statement, which will also seek to force tech giants to reveal how they target abusive and illegal online material posted by users.

The personal data of EU citizens “do not at present have an adequate level of protection in the U.K.,” Johnny Ryan, a senior fellow at the Irish Council for Civil Liberties, wrote in a letter to the European Commission on Monday.

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The U.K. “lacks an effective independent supervisory authority that is capable of enforcing compliance with data protection law and vindicating data subjects’ rights,” added Ryan.

Without a so-called adequacy decision from the EU by the end of the year, companies would be thrown into legal limbo and no longer be able to transfer data safely across the English Channel. At the risk of hefty fines under the EU’s strict data protection rules, U.K. companies that rely on data flows to and from the bloc would have to quickly find alternatives, involving more paperwork.

An EU adequacy decision would be a green light for such transfers without restrictions. To get there, the U.K. will have to meet a number of strict conditions. One of them is “the existence and effective functioning of one or more independent supervisory authorities,” according to the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR.

EU Regulators Take

11
Oct
2020
Posted in software

Automakers rush to take back software codes

The shift has old-school metal benders dipping into unfamiliar territory that long was the domain of high-tech companies. But like Toyota, automakers increasingly see the importance of bringing those programming skills in house, so they won’t play second fiddle to outside forces.

Tesla’s expertise in innovative software has made it a darling of Wall Street investors.

Doubt the impact? The Model S became the first electric vehicle to crack the 400-mile-range milestone this year, thanks to a software update. Tesla can tweak everything from performance to handling and ride comfort through over-the-air updates, keeping cars fresh between redesigns.

Other high-tech automotive interlopers, such as Uber Technologies Inc. or Alphabet Inc.’s well-established Waymo unit, stake their entire business model on their software prowess.

The advent of advanced safety systems and automated driving is spurring the transformation. But so is surging demand for on-the-go connectivity needed for infotainment and e-commerce.

Traditional makes are moving fast, too.

Volkswagen says all of its new models will run on a new vw.os operating system by 2025. And last year, the German giant unified its fragmented information technology units into an $8 billion subsidiary called Car.Software.

That unit, based in Ingolstadt, Germany, is tasked with developing computer systems in-house, and VW said up to 5,000 IT experts were set to start work in Car.Software this year. VW is plowing about $8.25 billion into the subsidiary by 2025, and the full version of vw.os will debut in an Audi.

Daimler, meanwhile, is banking on a slew of software-based features to raise the reputation of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class family as a technological trailblazer. In the next-generation S-Class, due at the end of the year, up to 50 in-car systems will permit over-the-air updates. The car can also identify drivers through facial recognition software and automatically adjust seating and